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Smartwater Releases New Sparkling Water

Smartwater Releases New Sparkling Water


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‘Tis the season of crowded gyms and fitness class coupons! As the gyms fill up, the need for hydration is steadily growing…and my addiction to sparkling water is off the charts. Those tiny little bubbles of happiness get me through the second half of the day. There’s something so satisfying in opening a carbonated beverage and hearing that crisp sound released. At least my addiction is a healthy one, and one that’s quickly on the rise.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

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Given our country’s new fascination with healthier living, sparkling water is becoming high in demand. Coca-Cola’s smartwater is answering that call with a sparkling water of their own. We’re hoping this has something to do with sales of flavored sodas being on the decline. With the addition of electrolytes, this sparkling water will make an excellent post-workout beverage. I can’t seem to think of anything as refreshing.

More Fabulous Food Finds:


Coca-Cola® Zero Sugar Launches in U.S. with New and Improved Real Coca-Cola Taste | Press Release

ATLANTA – July 26, 2017 – Since its 2005 introduction, Coca-Cola Zero™ has refreshed hundreds of millions of fans across America with its real Coca-Cola taste and zero calories. From its U.S. introduction into the Coca-Cola® trademark brand portfolio to its global expansion, the brand is sold in nearly 160 countries around the world.

Now, through in-house innovation and extensive market testing, Coca-Cola Zero is getting a new name, new look and even more delicious taste. The no-calorie fan favorite will deliver an even better-tasting recipe and now be called Coca-Cola Zero Sugar.

“More than 10 years ago, we launched Coca-Cola Zero with a revolutionary recipe that gave fans real Coca-Cola taste without the sugar and calories. The brand grew strongly after its launch and gained millions of loyal fans over time, but we recognized an opportunity to give the brand another boost and to encourage more Coca-Cola fans to try a great-tasting zero-sugar product,” said Stuart Kronauge, business unit president, USA Operations and senior vice president, Marketing, Coca-Cola North America.

“We’ve used our in-house innovation capabilities to make the great taste of Coke Zero even better and a lot like a Coke. To achieve this, we optimized the unique blend of flavors that gave Coke Zero its real Coca-Cola taste in the new and improved Coca-Cola Zero Sugar recipe. It’s delicious, refreshing and our best-tasting zero-sugar Coca-Cola yet,” Kronauge continued.

As the company continues to create new beverages and evolve its recipes, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar represents the company’s latest zero-sugar product innovation. It joins a roster of nearly 250 other delicious no- and low-calorie beverages offered in the U.S.

With more Coke Zero fans in the U.S. than in any other market in the world, consumer testing of the new recipe was conducted for over a year.

“We’re confident our new and improved Coke Zero Sugar recipe delivers a great taste that Coke Zero fans in the U.S. will love. We also hope that people who love the unforgettable taste of Coca-Cola, but want less sugar, will try it and enjoy,” Kronauge added.

Along with the improved recipe and taste, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar will have a new design that looks more like Coca-Cola. The updated package design will feature the iconic red Coca-Cola disc – a signature brand image synonymous with great taste – against the familiar black background known by loyal Coke Zero fans. In addition, the design prominently features “zero sugar” text to emphasize the drink does not contain sugar.

These packaging changes support the company’s “One Brand” strategy to bring its Coca-Cola portfolio of beverages together as a single trademark brand to show fans we have a Coca-Cola for everyone. The changes also support the company’s continued efforts to increase promotion of no- and low-sugar Coca-Cola options to help people looking to reduce their consumption of added sugars.

“For years we have offered people a choice – every sparkling brand we sell has a great-tasting, no-sugar version,” Kronauge said. “Introducing a new and improved recipe for one of our most popular no-calorie brands represents one of the biggest investments we’ve made since the 2005 Coke Zero launch to increase trial and awareness of a zero-sugar Coca-Cola option in the U.S.”

Coca-Cola Zero Sugar will be available on store shelves nationwide starting in August. The product launch will be supported through a robust integrated marketing campaign, including television, digital, radio, outdoor, social media and retail advertising that will promote the brand’s great Coca-Cola taste with zero sugar. Kicking off in September, the marketing campaign also will include an experiential sampling tour that will invite people in local communities across the country to try Coca-Cola Zero Sugar.


Health continues to be ‘defining trend’ in soft drinks

Pic:Getty/erstudiostok

In the UK consumers are seeking healthier options – particularly with fewer calories and less sugar – while the soft drinks industry levy is also putting pressure on the industry to reformulate.

“Health continued to be one of the defining trends for soft drinks in 2017,” ​says Britvic in its 2018 Soft Drinks Review. “Low and no sugar variants grew in carbonates categories, while water and water plus, continued to experienced strong growth as consumers searched for healthier hydration solutions.”

Sugar reduction

In the UK, low and no calorie drinks make up 43% of the carbonated drinks category, with a further 5% being mid-calorie, according to the British Soft Drinks Association.

Consumers’ sugar intake from carbonates has fell 19% between 2013 and 2017 and during the past year manufacturers have continued to reformulate beverages and reduce sugar in preparation of the UK soft drinks industry levy.

Britvic sees consumers turning to both low and no sugar versions of carbonated drinks as well as other categories that are perceived as healthier.

“The health agenda continued to be one of the defining trends in soft drinks in 2017, as great tasting low and no sugar brands outperformed their full sugar rivals in categories like cola, fruit carbonates and lemonade.

“As expected, traditional healthier segments such as water, water plus and particularly smoothies also continued to experience strong growth.

“Range rationalisation across the category remained an important focus for retailers. However, attention turned to re-balancing space to the categories that showed long term growth potential, such as those with a focus on health and products that were ‘on trend’.


Panda Express Now Offers Coca-Cola Beverages

ROSEMEAD, Calif. , May 8, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Panda Restaurant Group, Inc. ("Panda"), the parent company of Panda Express, America's largest family-owned and operated Asian restaurant concept, announces today that more than 2,000 Panda Express locations in the United States are now serving beverages from The Coca-Cola Company's broad portfolio of sparkling soft drinks, teas and waters. In Q4 2018, Panda signed a multi-year agreement with The Coca-Cola Company to be the new strategic beverage partner and, together, the two companies completed one of the fastest beverage transitions in Coca-Cola's partnership history. Rooted in shared values and a commitment to serving others, this partnership brings together two iconic companies with proven track records in their respective categories and supports Panda's continued strong growth.

Since the first Panda Inn restaurant opened in 1973, Panda has aimed to deliver exceptional dining experiences through a people-first mentality, focusing on its guests, employees, and the community. With a strong commitment to inspire better lives, Panda operates on common principles of its new beverage partner, which holds a mission of inspiring moments of optimism and happiness – intended to make a difference for others. Together, Panda and The Coca-Cola Company will continue to operate by these beliefs and use them to guide the family of restaurants in its continued evolution as the American Chinese original.

"As a family-owned company, the relationships we create at Panda Restaurant Group are essential to the exceptional operating culture we have always been known for," said Dr. Peggy Cherng , co-founder and co-CEO of Panda Restaurant Group. "Coca-Cola's remarkable accomplishments as a brand and internally as a company motivate us to reach for our greatest potential and are bringing invaluable new ideas that will please our Guests for years to come."

In conjunction with its committed brand tenets, The Coca-Cola Company is the world's largest beverage company and partner to some of today's most prominent restaurant chains. Its seasoned foodservice presence, industry expertise and innovation will unlock a fresh perspective for Panda that will push forth its progression within the industry and global expansion. Additionally, the staple American Chinese cuisine at Panda Express and Panda Inn will be complemented by Coca-Cola's broad portfolio of beverages that guests have adored for more than 130 years.

"Panda Restaurant Group is an exciting addition to the Coca-Cola family," said Kathleen Ciaramello , President of Coca-Cola North America Foodservice and On-Premise. "They are a company committed to excellence and value, focused on bringing positive change to this world. This partnership is not only a strong collaboration within the food and beverage industry but also showcases how two brands uniting through collective values can create positive momentum for everyone involved."


7- SodaStream Has Stop Working or Has an Internal Problem

SodaStream has excellent customer service and they are willing to help you out with any troubles that may arise with your SodaStream Machine.

So I advise you to contact them you can click on this link to visit their Contact Page.

Better yet if you have a warranty do not attempt to open up your SodaStream instead just return it and get a new one, if you open it up you might just lose your warranty.

Also, do not take chances and try to fix these machine yourself you are dealing with pressurized CO2 gases best thing to leave these things to the experts.

Side Note: Did you also know that SodaStream Bottles expire after a while you can click to read when, why they expire and learn much more about SodaStream Bottles?


Bon Appétit Announces The 50 Finalists For America's Best New Restaurants 2017

NEW YORK , Aug. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Today Bon Appétit announced the 50 frontrunners for The Hot 10: America's Best New Restaurants 2017. This year's winners of the annual list will be revealed in the September issue and on bonappetit.com on August 15 .

"These are the tastiest, most exciting places we ate at over the last 12 months," says deputy editor Andrew Knowlton . He and special projects editor Julia Kramer traveled 35,000 miles, eating more than 1,000 meals in 40 U.S. cities and small towns in search of the country's best. The list of 50 finalists is now available at bonappetit.com/top50.

"From a whole-hog BBQ behemoth to a new-school Jewish deli to a formal brasserie resurrecting the classics, these are the restaurants that blew us away," says Knowlton.

Along the way, Bon Appétit uncovered a new wave of restaurant trends, including the rise of family-owned businesses, the celebration of second-generation immigrant cooking culture, and the boom in creative sandwich shops. "Going out to eat doesn't have to mean a fine-dining experience," says Kramer. "Chefs are making a wider range of foods more accessible to more people, and we're grateful to see America expand her palate."

Bon Appétit has published its picks for America's Best New Restaurants since 1993. No other publication dedicates the time, research, and calorie count that Bon Appétit puts into its list. This year, bonappetit.com is bringing the journey across America to life through recipes, interactive features, and exclusive video content. To learn more, follow #BAHOT10.

Tickets are on sale for A Night With America's Best New Restaurants on September 6 in New York City . The fifth annual party invites Bon Appétit fans to meet The Hot 10 inductees while tasting their way through the best food in America. Event partners include Alfa Romeo, Folgers® Simply Gourmet™, Patrón Tequila, smartwater® and smartwater® sparkling, Président® Cheese, lesley stowe raincoast crisps®, A to Z Wineworks and Santa Margherita Wines . Tickets are available at bahot10.com.

ABOUT BON APPÉTIT
Bon Appétit is where food and culture meet. The award-winning No. 1 food lifestyle brand covers food through the lens of cooking, fashion, travel, technology, design, and home. Bon Appétit has been named to Advertising Age's A-List for five consecutive years, including Magazine of the Year 2013 and Brand of the Year 2015, and has been named to Adweek's Hot List every year since 2012, including Hottest Food Magazine in 2013. Bon Appétit has also been nominated for 23 National Magazine Awards in the past five years, including wins in 2014 for General Excellence and Photography, and in 2017 for General Excellence.


Student “chefs” nationwide compete for chance to cook up college scholarship

whitestone, ny (april 4, 2006) – beginning today, high school students across the country will be chopping, dicing and sweating over a hot stove in an effort to take their education to the next level — courtesy of vitaminschool. this cooking competition is all part of a 12-city public service campaign aimed at educating high school students about how to get more of the nutrients they need without giving up the flavors and taste they crave. entries are being accepted at www.freelunchmoney.com.

nearly half of the children in the united states will be overweight by 2010, up from what recent studies say is about one third, according to a report published by the international journal of pediatric obesity. sponsored by glacéau®, vitaminschool is an effort aimed at helping to break this cycle by empowering students to abandon the empty calorie, preservative-filled norm, and take steps towards a healthier, more positive lifestyle for themselves and their communities.

high school students in each of the tour markets (including houston, dallas, los angeles, san francisco, seattle, chicago, detroit, new york, atlanta, washington, dc, philadelphia and boston) are being asked to submit recipes for the most nutrient-rich school cafeteria lunch they can come up with including a main course, fruit or other healthy desert, and to wash the meal down, their favorite variety of vitaminwater®. three area students in each of the tour markets with the best recipes will be invited to present their creations live at the vitaminschool “cafeteria” in front of three high-profile local judges and a nutritionist at a local high school. each semi-finalist will win $5,000 cash for their school to promote healthy eating as well as free vitaminwater for a year. at the event, the judges will select one winner to become their city’s finalist and will automatically be entered into the next round of competition for the chance to go to the grand finale event in new york city and compete for the grand prize: a college scholarship* (up to the value of $100,000) from glacéau.

“kids today are a lot smarter about nutrition than most companies give them credit for,” said j. darius bikoff, founder and ceo, glacéau (the sponsor of the program). “vitaminschool is an opportunity for students to demonstrate how they would go about improving their diets in a way that works for them, if given the tools to do it.”


These 5 Smart Water Gadgets Will Help You Stay Hydrated This Summer

This bev simply contains carbonated water and some natural flavors, with no added sugars. Add this to the list of grab-and-go drinks for when your thirst hits.

To note: According to the FDA, natural flavor pertains to natural essence or oils from a variety of spices, fruits, vegetables and other plants and foods. This definition is a broad umbrella that covers a spectrum of potential ingredients. Translation, we’re never 100 percent sure what those natural flavors are.


Archives

Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) has at least 186 reasons to celebrate World Environment Day – that’s how many Olympic-sized swimming pools could be filled with the amount of water the company saved last year by cutting down on the water used in making its products.

CCBA has significantly reduced the amount of water required to produce one litre of product over the past five years and in 2020 alone reduced its usage by 463 Megalitres, equivalent to 186 Olympic swimming pools.

The company also made a substantial contribution to The Coca-Cola Foundation’s (TCCF) Replenish Africa Initiative (RAIN), where six million people in more than 4 000 communities across 41 countries have gained improved access to clean water. CCBA’s partnership with TCCF to implement RAIN has resulted in three million people having access to water across CCBA’s territories alone.

In 2020, CCBA also replenished 4 665 Megalitres of water in the countries where it operates on the continent. That is equivalent to 186 Olympic size swimming pools.

“We continuously introduce new technologies to reduce the amount of water we use and improve water efficiency in our manufacturing processes, as well as to reuse wastewater,” said CCBA CEO Jacques Vermeulen.

“We make progress every year and we have already reduced our water usage ratios this year compared to 2020 as we work towards achieving our 2021 target of 1.82 litres of water used for every litre (L/L) produced with some of our markets aiming even lower,” said Vermeulen.

There is also positive news on the plastic waste front, where CCBA is confident it will reach its 100% collection and recycling global target well in advance of 2030.

The PET Recycling Company (PETCO) was initiated in South Africa in 2004 as an industry-led initiative for the collection and recycling of PET bottles. PETCO reported that 62% of all PET plastic beverage bottles produced in 2019 were collected for recycling, while in 2020, PETCO and partners recycled an estimated 55% of PET beverage bottles in South Africa, due to the impact of Covid-19. This model has since been established in Kenya and Ethiopia, with Tanzania launching soon and other markets in planning.

As the continent’s biggest Coke bottler, accounting for 40% of all Coca-Cola volumes sold in Africa, CCBA is tracking ahead of the global Coca-Cola target to make 100% of its plastic packaging recyclable by 2025. The company also aims to stimulate the circular economy by making 50% of all plastic packaging from recycled materials by 2030.

These achievements are the fruits of the company’s participation in The Coca-Cola Company’s global World Without Waste strategy, with commitments to recover every bottle or can it sells by 2030 and then to recycle and reuse.

“We produce and distribute soft drink brands that people love. And we are increasingly doing this in ways that create a more sustainable business and a better shared future that makes a difference in people’s lives, communities and our planet,” said CCBA CEO Jacques Vermeulen.

“Importantly, we are working in partnership with others, including fellow manufacturers, retailers, and governments to be more successful and efficient.”

Climate change is a critical area of sustainability, and CCBA is addressing this through cooler equipment innovation and increasingly using solar power as part of its commitment to reduce its carbon footprint by 25% by 2030, from 2015 levels.

“We are also working with our supply chain to continuously improve sustainable and ethical sourcing practices, including a continued commitment to human rights. As at the end of 2020, our local sourcing was already at 83.5%, exceeding the global target to source locally 80% of the raw materials usually imported by 2022. In this context, our target for 2021 is 85%,” Vermeulen said.

CCBA toasts Africa Day and fifth anniversary since merger

Africa Day coincides with a big milestone for Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) this year, as the company celebrates its fifth birthday as the biggest Coca-Cola bottler on the continent, with a growing contribution to economic growth and shared prosperity.

When CCBA was established in 2016, a number of opportunities were identified for realising its growth potential, including to expand into territories the company hadn’t operated in before, and to consolidate existing territories.

Research by Fitch Solutions shows that the global soft drinks industry was worth around $295 billion in 2018 and is expected to grow to $377 billion by 2023. Africa accounts for only 3% of this total value, despite representing 16% of the global population, which is expected to reach 25% by 2050.

By October 2020, the company had successfully concluded acquisitions in four new countries, increasing its markets to 14 countries, and also acquired significant business interests in Kenya.

The company now boasts a diverse African footprint, with more than 40 bottling plants servicing over 650 000 outlets that serve a combined population of over 450 million people across the continent.

It directly employs more than 17 000 people and enjoys the number-one market position in most of its territories.

“By leveraging our infrastructure and processes to unlock operational efficiencies and synergies, we have greatly improved customer service, expanded our beverage portfolio, strengthened our route to market and, importantly, accelerated the development of communities and employees,” said CCBA CEO Jacques Vermeulen.

“As a stronger, more successful beverage bottling business, we are able to create greater shared opportunity for the business as well as the communities we serve across the value chain through job creation, skills development and support for small-to-medium sized enterprises.”

In South Africa, the company has redirected R7.8 billion of its procurement spending to black-owned and black women-owned suppliers over three years, against its own preferential procurement target of R3.9bn for the period. New suppliers are integrated into the CCBSA supply chain and assisted to meet the company’s requirements.

CCBSA’s agricultural development fund, known as the Mintirho Foundation Trust, has disbursed more than R335.6 million to date to support the establishment of new agricultural businesses that have created much-needed employment in rural communities. In addition, through the Mintirho Foundation Trust’s flexible funding instruments and operational support, beneficiaries have been able to diversify their operations to focus on producing high-income crops such as macadamia nuts, citrus and pome fruit. The Mintirho Foundation Trust has also provided R98.2 million to 10 women-owned agricultural enterprises to support a wide range of growth and expansion initiatives.

CCBA has introduced many initiatives across Africa to improve on the impact of its operations on the environment, focusing on the reduction of water consumption, energy usage and waste generation.

CCBA has significantly reduced the amount of water required to produce one litre of product over the past five years and in 2020 alone reduced its usage by 463 Megalitres, equivalent to 186 swimming pools of Olympic size.

The company has also managed to contain its energy efficiency to 0.32 Megajoules for manufacturing a litre of product, despite facing the challenges to incorporate manufacturing its own supply of PET preforms and expanding into new countries, in many cases inheriting older equipment with less energy efficient profiles.

CCBA has adopted a digital strategy to enable the business to operate as one, deploying Microsoft Dynamics 365, Microsoft 365, and Azure to reduce IT costs from 2.85% of net sales revenue to just below 1.4% of net sales revenue, while enhancing its customer and employee experience in the process.

This stood the company in good stead when the Covid-19 pandemic struck, allowing CCBA to continue operating and communicating seamlessly throughout.

By focusing on safeguarding employees, enhancing liquidity, taking care of communities and growing or maintaining its value share during the pandemic, CCBA adapted and found better, more effective ways of operating, which will accelerate its future growth.

In April, The Coca-Cola Company and CCBA announced plans to list CCBA as a publicly traded company. Shares will be listed within the next 18 months in Amsterdam and Johannesburg, with Amsterdam being the primary exchange.

“In the five years since the merger, CCBA has taken big strides towards realising its vision to refresh Africa every day and make the continent a better place for all,” says Vermeulen.

“We have focused on accelerating growth and social development in our value chain and making clear commitments on waste, energy, water and land use to lead the way as a responsible business in Africa.”

The Coca-Cola Company and Coca-Cola Beverages Africa Announce Plans for Initial Public Offering for Bottler

ATLANTA and JOHANNESBURG, April 19, 2021 – The Coca-Cola Company and Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) today announced plans to list CCBA as a publicly traded company.

The Coca-Cola Company intends to sell a portion of its shareholding in CCBA via an initial public offering. The decision is in line with The Coca-Cola Company’s objective of focusing its resources on building consumer-loved brands and innovation.

The companies intend for an IPO within the next 18 months. The exact timing will be driven by a number of factors, including macroeconomic conditions. Shares will be listed in Amsterdam and Johannesburg, with Amsterdam being the primary exchange.

The IPO will allow CCBA to operate as an independent, Africa-focused, South Africanheadquartered, managed and domiciled business. The plans underscore The Coca-Cola Company’s continued and long-term belief and commitment to the African continent and the leadership of CCBA from South Africa.

“The Coca-Cola Company sees Africa as a key growth market and views a separate listing of CCBA as an opportunity to deliver a broad, supportive, long-term investor base for the ongoing development of the business,” said Bruno Pietracci, president of the Africa operating unit of The Coca-Cola Company.

“A standalone listing for CCBA will enable the bottler to build on its growth trajectory and access capital independently to meet the investment needs of the business, which is great for stakeholders across Africa,” said Jacques Vermeulen, CEO of CCBA.

The Coca-Cola Company has retained Rothschild & Co. to advise on the IPO.

About The Coca-Cola Company

The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is a total beverage company with products sold in more than 200 countries and territories. Our company’s purpose is to refresh the world and make a difference. We sell multiple billion-dollar brands across several beverage categories worldwide. Our portfolio of sparkling soft drink brands includes Coca-Cola, Sprite and Fanta. Our hydration, sports, coffee and tea brands include Dasani, smartwater, vitaminwater, Topo Chico, Powerade, Costa, Georgia, Gold Peak, Honest and Ayataka. Our nutrition, juice, dairy and plant-based beverage brands include Minute Maid, Simply, innocent, Del Valle, fairlife and AdeS. We’re constantly transforming our portfolio, from reducing sugar in our drinks to bringing innovative new products to market. We seek to positively impact people’s lives, communities and the planet through water replenishment, packaging recycling, sustainable sourcing practices and carbon emissions reductions across our value chain. Together with our bottling partners, we employ more than 700,000 people, helping bring economic opportunity to local communities worldwide. Learn more at www.coca-colacompany.com and follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn.

About Coca-Cola Beverages Africa

CCBA is the 8th largest Coca-Cola bottling partner in the world by revenue, and thel argest on the continent. It accounts for 40 percent of all Coca-Cola products sold in Africa by volume. With over 16,000 employees in Africa, CCBA services millions of customers with a host of international and local brands. The group was formed in July 2016 after the successful combination of the Southern and East Africa bottling operations of the non-alcoholic ready-to-drink beverages businesses of The Coca-Cola Company, SABMiller plc and Gutsche Family Investments. CCBA shareholders are currently: The Coca-Cola Company 66.5% and Gutsche Family Investments 33.5%.

CCBA’s African footprint now encompasses South Africa, Ghana, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Namibia, Mozambique, Comoros, Mayotte, Zambia, Botswana, Eswatini and Lesotho.

This announcement is not an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy any securities to be issued by CCBA in any jurisdiction, including the United States. The securities of CCBA have not been and will not be registered under the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and may not be offered absent registration or an exemption from registration. There will be no public offering of the securities in the United States.

Forward-looking statements

This press release may contain statements, estimates or projections that constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined under U.S. federal securities laws. Generally, the words “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “anticipate,” “project,” “will” and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements, which generally are not historical in nature. Forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause The Coca-Cola Company’s actual results to differ materially from its historical experience and our present expectations or projections. These risks include, but are not limited to, our ability to realize the anticipated benefits from the potential initial public offering of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, including whether such initial public offering will be completed on the anticipated timeline, if at all, and other risks discussed in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), including our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 and our subsequently filed reports, which filings are available from the SEC. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date they are made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements.

Investors and Analysts: Tim Leveridge, [email protected]

Media for The Coca-Cola Company: Scott Leith, [email protected], or Patricia Obozuwa, [email protected]

Media for Coca-Cola Beverages Africa: Wendy Thole-Muir, [email protected]

The Coca-Cola Foundation helps millions on the continent with access to clean water

Six million Africans in more than 4 000 communities across 41 countries have gained improved access to clean water thanks to the work of The Coca-Cola Foundation in a programme called the Replenish Africa Initiative (RAIN).

RAIN improves community access to water and sanitation while promoting better hygiene, for positive impacts on health and development. This lowers the risk of disease and the dignity, privacy and safety of communities, especially vulnerable women and children, is ensured. Education and training on improved hygiene behaviours and handwashing complement water access and sanitation to promote healthier living.

The programme was launched in 2009 to help countries across Africa achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals on clean water and sanitation (SDG 6).

The programme’s success in reaching six million people is the result of a collective effort from more than 300 international and local public, private and civil society partners.

Coca-Cola Beverages Africa CEO Jacques Vermeulen said that as the largest Coke bottler on the continent, the company was especially pleased by the success of these partnerships in providing clean water to communities.

“By working together we achieve so much more than we could individually,” said Vermeulen.

“Over the past decade, RAIN has improved access to clean water for communities, schools, and clinics across Africa, while creating opportunities for employment, entrepreneurship, and skills generation. RAIN has also helped to protect critical watersheds, supported local governments to cope with rapidly growing water demand in cities, and delivered essential hygiene items and personal protective equipment to help slow the spread of COVID-19.”

In XXX, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa <<<insert local examples here>>>

The experience of developing and implementing RAIN resulted in important learnings that helped to improve its effectiveness, said Vermeulen.

“We realised the importance of accelerating integrated water resources management efforts to decrease stress on food production, water supply and sanitation services. Source protection for priority watersheds that serve the drinking water needs of millions of Africans is another critical factor.

“Addressing the gender gap and focusing on the needs of women was another major element because they play a critical role in community resilience and are uniquely empowered by access to hygiene and sanitation services.

“Finally, we found that improving the collection, accessibility, sharing and use of data helped to monitor hygiene and sanitation services, and improve performance, planning and decision making,” said Vermeulen.

“Africa is experiencing the highest rate of urban growth globally and is home to 21 of the world’s 30 fastest-growing cities.

“Africa is also more vulnerable to climate change than any other region and water resilience and conservation are essential to ensure African economies can continue to grow sustainably, along with businesses like ours.

“CCBA is committed to working with communities and governments to enhance climate change adaptation and help address the challenges that urbanisation creates for the delivery of clean water and sanitation throughout the continent,” Vermeulen said.

CCBA bottles and distributes beverages whose trademarks are owned by The Coca-Cola Company (TCCC) or TCCC’s affiliated entities and is the world’s 8 th largest Coca-Cola bottler by revenue. CCBA has over 17 000 employees across its operations in Africa with more than 40 bottling plants in 14 countries.

The creation of CCBA in 2016 was designed to advance a consolidated, more successful Coca-Cola system on the continent.

Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) accounts for about 40% of all Coca-Cola volumes sold in Africa.

CCBA began its operations as a legal entity in July 2016 having been created as a direct result of a merger between non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations of The Coca-Cola Company, (then) SABMiller and the Gutsche Family Investments.

CCBA shareholders now are: The Coca-Cola Company 66.5% and Gutsche Family Investments 33.5%.

CCBA boasts a diverse pan-African footprint servicing over 650 000 outlets that serve a combined population of over 350 million people across the continent.

Our operations in sub-Saharan Africa comprise the following markets: South Africa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Namibia, Ghana, Mayotte, the Comoros, Botswana, Zambia, Eswatini and Lesotho.

CCBA is a world-class, customer-orientated, socially and environmentally conscious fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) company. Sales and distribution excellence are our core strengths.

CCBA is pursuing an ambitious sustainable growth strategy that will be supported through investment in manufacturing, sales, distribution and marketing.

CCBA aspires to refresh Africa every day and to make the continent a better place for all.

Community Gets Innovative Facelift

Reliable access to good safe water is essential to life, nature, and the health of our communities. Across the world, approximately 1.9 billion people live in potentially water-scarce areas. South Africa is regarded as the 30 th most water scarce country in the world, with little fresh water resources.

In March 2020, Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) installed a groundwater harvesting project in Tshikota Village, Makhado. Through the project, we want to provide water access to 2000 homes. To date, 14 million litres of water have been distributed in the community. The groundwater harvesting project involves constructing three solar powered borehole systems that provide water to surrounding households. Following the success of the project, CCBSA built the same project in Makushoaneng village in Zebediela. The project was launched at the beginning of December and to date, 700 000 litres has been provided to the community and is expected to benefit over 2000 households. We will provide 50 water wheelers to community members who are too fragile to walk to the boreholes daily. These water wheelers will be distributed by the Makushoaneng Tribal Authority.

Furthermore, the community of Makushoaneng will be receiving other projects, this will include a new, sustainable, 29-meter vegetable garden which will be handed over to a local NGO run by women and caters food to local, elderly women daily. In support of local economic development, we identified a young female entrepreneur who will receive a spaza shop container to run her business from, she will also receive an upgrade to her car wash business and training on how to run and maintain a business.

“Our aim is to create greater shared opportunity for the business, stakeholders and the communities we serve. We are committed to using water more responsibly in our operations, return water to the environment and improve access to water for communities” said Nathalie Hendricks, Regional Public Affairs and Communications Manager. CCBSA, together with the Makushoaneng Tribal Authority, recognise that the community can thrive when there is a reliable water source to sustain life.

“No one organisation can solve the world’s water issues by itself, but through innovative and meaningful public and private partnerships, this vital shared resource can be protected. Therefore, to ensure that the community of Makushoaneng has improved infrastructure and reliable access to clean water, CCBSA partnered with the Lepelle-Nkumpi Local municipality and Department of Human Settlement, Water and Sanitation (DHSWS) and the local NGO. .

The project handover will take place on 18 March 2021 at Makushoaneng village.

About CCBSA

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

Groundwater harvesting systems launched in the Eastern Cape

Residents of Dala and Daberha villages in the Ngcobo town of the Chris Hani District Municipality, as well as citizens of Bolotwa, located in Queenstown, in the Eastern Cape are set to receive a much-needed boost in their water supply. This will come with the launch of new solar powered underwater pumping and treatment systems through the Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) Coke Ville Groundwater Project.

The two solar powered facilities being handed over during National Water Week from the 16 th to 22 nd of March are the latest in five viable self-sustaining groundwater projects that have been identified in Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal, and Eastern Cape. Through these systems the Coke Ville Project aims to deliver over 90 million litres per year by the end of 2021.

The Queenstown facility was technically completed in November 2020 and has already distributed 1.4 million litres to communities since then.

“Groundwater is a huge untapped water source that can effectively satisfy the demand of a fast-growing population while easing the burden on the system,” says Nozicelo Ngcobo, Public Affairs, Communication and Sustainability Director at CCBSA. “Not only does this mean cleaner water and better health outcomes for citizens but allows municipalities the margin to maintain and upgrade existing infrastructure.”

Government’s long-term water resource plan currently underway involves moving the country to alternative sources, include reusing and recycling grey water, rainwater harvesting and groundwater.

According to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), only 64% of households in the country have access to a reliable water supply service. Approximately 11% of wastewater treatment and water treatment works are completely dysfunctional, while 56% of wastewater treatment works and 44% of water treatment works are in poor condition.

Of the available resources, groundwater has the best potential to support a fast-growing population. It is estimated that South Africa has the same amount of groundwater as surface water. While groundwater use has increased by an average of 0,6% per year during the past four years, only about 40% (or 3 billion cubic metres per year) of available groundwater is used.

“Groundwater is typically cleaner than surface water, meaning it is easier to treat,” Ngcobo says. “It can also be deployed much faster in areas where an accessible source is identified, reducing the cost of transmission with shorter pipelines and simpler maintenance.”

About CCBSA

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

Global Recycling Day calls on us to work together for a World Without Waste

Jacques Vermeulen

Along with its devastating human and economic costs, the COVID-19 pandemic has put renewed focus on sustainability. The experience of mass human vulnerability to the accidents of nature has reminded us of the need to live in harmony with the natural environment if we are to survive as a species.

As James Quincey, Coca-Cola CEO and Chairman, recently put it: “COVID-19 has highlighted the urgent need for collaborative, cross-sector solutions to climate change, plastic waste and other critical environmental and social issues. The crisis has shone a light on the interconnected nature of our world and the lessons we learn must be applied to help us emerge stronger and get to a more sustainable and inclusive economic future.”

The question, against the backdrop of the severe economic damage caused by the pandemic, is how social partners can work better together to build this future.

Global Recycling Day on March 18 gives us the chance to think anew about how to advance the prosperity of Africa by growing our economies inclusively, while reducing the impact of packaging waste on the environment.

A big part of the answer is to build a circular green economy that enables recycling and draws in the public and private sectors, communities and other stakeholders in a collaborative effort.

For our part, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) has made our ambitious recycling targets a top business priority, alongside key performance metrics for growth and profitability.

In other words, we measure our business success not only according to growth and profits, but also by doing business the right way – following our values and working toward solutions that benefit not only us all but also future generations. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. We don’t believe there’s another way of doing business the right way.

Our commitment is to invest in our planet and our packaging, to help make the world’s packaging problem a thing of the past.

The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partners are leading the industry with a bold, ambitious goal: to help collect and recycle a bottle or can for every one we sell by 2030. We want to support local governments’ waste management objectives by making recycling more accessible and to achieve 100% collection and recycling by 2030.

In addition, as a system our goals include to make all our consumer packaging 100% recyclable globally by 2025 and use at least 50% recycled material in our packaging by 2030. This is part of our larger strategy to grow with conscience as we become a total beverage company.

In the 14 markets where CCBA operates, we are on track to meet these targets well ahead of schedule.

Holistic solutions to challenges like packaging waste require partnerships, and it is important that we work together to ensure transformation, inclusion and sustainability of the circular economy across the continent.

For their part, governments can contribute by creating an enabling regulatory environment to help stimulate sustainable practices.

Regulators also play a crucial role in facilitating public-private partnerships, setting packaging standards and driving policies that encourage the circular economy to thrive for greater economic inclusion of people.

What we need is for communities, countries, governments and regulators to accelerate the shift towards circular, or closed-loop business models. However, for it to be implemented successfully requires high levels of collaboration.

We believe that the concept of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) is the most efficient means to support the circular economy. Paying EPR fees and striving to increasingly use recycled plastic, even if it costs more than virgin plastic, ultimately enables the circular economy.

PETCO is a great example – this model was initiated in South Africa in 2004 as an industry-led initiative for collection and recycling of PET bottles. It has since been established in Kenya and Ethiopia, with Tanzania launching soon and other markets in planning.

We know that for developing economies these costs can be a real challenge as it potentially adds cost at the level of the consumer. However, closed-loop business models are more efficient at retaining value than recycling that results in non-circular products. This is why we support the use of recycled plastic within the Coca-Cola system so that we can create new bottles from recycled bottles.

A more sustainable, more inclusive Africa, free of waste, is possible if we work together in collaboration for the common good of our continent.

*Vermeulen is CEO of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa

Coca-Cola Kwanza Support Government’s Efforts on lifting Education Sector in Rural Areas by Donating Desks worth Tanzania Shillings 10m/- to Prime Minister Majaliwa.

Coca-Cola Kwanza Ltd on Saturday donated 100 desks to Ruangwa District in the Lindi Region, an initiative intended to back government’s efforts towards improvement of the Education Sector in rural areas.

A subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa’s donation worth 10 Million Tanzanian shillings was received by Prime minister and Ruangwa Constituent Member of Parliament Hon. Hon. Kassim Majaliwa Majaliwa and is aimed at lifting up the education sector in rural areas and addressing the challenges of school desks shortage.

Speaking at the event, Coca-Cola Kwanza’s Director of Public Affairs, Communication and Sustainability, Mr. Salum Nassor said the company’s donation aimed at bringing back to the community part of the gains.

“Coca Cola Kwanza’s vision is to refresh and improve lives of Tanzanians in various sectors including the education sector. We do business the right way for a better-shared future, this support will resolve school desks shortages benefitting 200 students at a time in Ruangwa District and can be used for over 10 years”, he said.

Mr. Nassor added, “There is a great focus in the Southern Regions of Tanzania, we opened a Strategic Selling Depot (SSD) in Lindi last year and are planning to open another in Mtwara in April this year to bring our products closer to the consumers’ arm reach. Same way, we have donated 100 desks in Kibiti in January and same amount in Ruangwa today”

The Coca-Cola Kwanza’s Director urged other institutions, stakeholders, and non-government organizations to work together and support the government’s efforts in finding solutions to community problems.

Speaking at the event, Ruangwa Member of Parliament and the Prime minister of the United Republic of Tanzania Hon. Kassim Majaliwa Majaliwa congratulated Coca-Cola Kwanza for their continuous support and said it is the community’s responsibility to preserve, protect and utilize wisely different supports from stakeholders.

Since launching the initiative of making School desks as part of its corporate social responsibility, Coca-Cola Kwanza Ltd has made and distributed over 3,000 desks to various schools, impacting lives of over 6,000 students at a time.

CCBA is the 8 th largest Coca-Cola bottling partner in the world by revenue, and the largest on the continent. It accounts for 40 percent of all Coca-Cola products sold in Africa by volume.

CCBA’s African footprint now encompasses South Africa, Ghana, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Namibia, Mozambique, Comoros, Mayotte, Zambia, Botswana, Eswatini and now Lesotho. The group employs more than 16 000 people directly, almost half of them in South Africa.

Coca-Cola Kwanza Backs Government Efforts to Improve Learning Environment by Donating Desks Worth Tanzania Shillings 10m/-

Coca-Cola Kwanza Ltd on Saturday donated 100 desks to Kibiti District in the Coast Region, an initiative intended to support government efforts towards improvement of learning.

A subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa donation worth Sh10 million that was received by Kibiti District Commissioner Mr Gullamhussein Kifu is aimed at addressing the challenges of the shortage of school desks in primary schools in the area.

Kibiti District officials say the donation will benefit three primary schools in the area with acute shortage of desks.

Speaking at the event, Coca Cola Kwanza Director of Public Affairs, Communication and Sustainability, Mr Salum Nassor said the company’s donation aimed at bringing back to the community part of the gains.

“Coca Cola Kwanza objective is to refresh and improve lives of Tanzanians in various sectors including education and this is one of reasons for donating desks to Kibiti District,” he said.

Mr Nassor added, “The desks donated here at Kibiti were made from the pallets made to carry raw materials for making the Coca Cola Kwanza soft drinks. This shows how the company is making efficient use of the resources available for the benefit of the community,”

The Coca Cola Kwanza Director urged other institutions, stakeholders and non-government organisations work together and support the government efforts find solution to community problems.

Speaking at the event, Kibiti Member of Parliament, Twaha Mpembenwe said the donation of desks has come at the right time at the commencement of the new school year with huge number of students’ registration due to free education.

On his part, Kibiti DC Mr Kifu said the donation of desks from Coca cola Kwanza demonstrate the good and healthy relations between the government and the private sector which is benefitting the community.

Mr Kifu insisted that the desks donated to schools in Kibiti District will be an incentive for students to raise their performance.

Since when they launched the initiative of making desks as part of its corporate social responsibility, Coca-Cola has made and distributed over 3,000 desks to various schools.

CCBA is the 8 th largest Coca-Cola bottling partner in the world by revenue, and the largest on the continent. It accounts for 40 percent of all Coca-Cola products sold in Africa by volume.

CCBA’s African footprint now encompasses South Africa, Ghana, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Namibia, Mozambique, Comoros, Mayotte, Zambia, Botswana, Eswatini and now Lesotho. The group employs more than 16 000 people directly, almost half of them in South Africa.

CCBSA triples the size of its employee share ownership scheme

CCBSA’s B-BBEE ownership will be increased to a revised 20% target, with a significant worker ownership component.

“This updated agreement will result in employees increasing their current holding of around 5% in CCBSA to an approximate 15% shareholding in CCBSA,” said Velaphi Ratshefola, MD of CCBSA.

CCBSA has also agreed to additional commitments which will positively impact employees, existing B-BBEE shareholders and South African localisation initiatives.

CCBSA will also be assisting government with the creation of a localisation platform, that sits at the heart of government’s economic recovery plan, by contributing R80m per year for three years to localisation initiatives that form part of the national efforts to rebuild the economy. “We have also undertaken to collaborate with our sugar suppliers to increase the volume of sugarcane procured from Black farmers,” Ratshefola added.

“The commitment from CCBSA to increase the level of worker ownership in the company, deepen the level of transformation in the sugar value chain and support the broader localisation drive in the economy, are important steps in our efforts to create a more inclusive economy in South Africa,” said Minister Ebrahim Patel, Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition. “It’s an example of what companies can do, and we look forward to others following their lead, as we drive an enhanced model of broad-based transformation, through worker empowerment, in our country.” said Minister Patel

“We want to thank Minister Patel, the DTIC and the Competition Authorities for the constructive and positive engagement which has resulted in an effective solution, in a very challenging environment, that directly benefits both the employees of CCBSA and assists government with their important localisation initiatives, which is fully supported by the Coca-Cola system in South Africa. We look forward to the strengthening of our partnership with government in this way and it underscores our commitment to doing business the right way by creating a better, more inclusive future for all,” Ratshefola concluded.

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

COCA-COLA ENHANCES CONSUMER ACCESS TO ITS BEVERAGES WITH A HOME DELIVERY SERVICE

The Coca-Cola system partners in Kenya have today launched a new home delivery service ‘DialACoke.com’ that will provide consumers with access to its range of beverages from the comfort of their home, office, business premises or whatever location they are. As part of its launch offer, customers can order all products at a 20% discount on the platform as soon as it goes live while stocks last.

‘DialACoke.com’ is an online platform that gives consumers a convenient, quick and safe home delivery service for Coca-Cola products ordered.

“We have developed the DialACoke.com platform to ensure our consumers continue to access and enjoy their favorite Coca-Cola drinks from the convenience of their homes,” said Theuri Chege, Commercial Manager, East and Central Africa.

Speaking about the service, Xavier Selga, Managing Director, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa – Kenya said: “The platform has been designed to be easy to use for our consumers with very simple steps of ordering your favorite Coca-Cola beverage of choice. It has also been optimized for mobile use to ensure each consumer with a smartphone can be able to easily make an order. Orders placed before 12 noon will be mostly delivered on the same day and the rest will be scheduled for the next day or the date specified by the customer. There will be no deliveries on Sundays, but orders can still be made for Monday deliveries.”

To place an order, consumers will need to go to www.DialACoke.com and select the Coca-Cola products they want and place them into the shopping cart. They will be required to validate the order as part of the check-out process, confirm their delivery address and the date it’s required. Orders will be paid for via MPESA. An order confirmation message will be sent to the consumer as they check out from the site. The delivery will be dispatched to the customer after payment is received.

“The home delivery service, coupled with our wide national reach through our distributors, will ensure delivery of orders across the country. Through this elaborate engagement platform, we will be able to listen to our consumers and deliver orders at their doorstep and with utmost regard to safety”, emphasized Theuri.

“The DialACoke.com team has undergone training and certification to safely handle all deliveries from our distributors to the consumer. We have also ensured that the teams handling all consumer orders are equipped with the necessary Personal Protection Equipment for safe home delivery service that includes gloves, facemasks, and hand sanitizers. We have also invested in quality packaging that ensures that all consumer orders are insulated and safe,” said Theuri Chege, Commercial Manager, Coca-Cola East and Central Africa.

The platform will be available as an addition to other Coca-Cola services to its consumers going forward. Coca-Cola has also set up a dedicated a 24 hour helpline number 0727 093 444 and email: [email protected] that are manned by experienced customer care agents.

Men of Honour inspire Activism

South Africans are becoming increasingly distraught by the seemingly rampant scourge of gender-based violence. As the world marks 16 Days of Activism, Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) MD, Velaphi Ratshefola discusses how a different approach, focusing on healing men’s deep wounds, rather than punitive measures, can make an even more lasting impact.

The International 16 Days of Activism for No Violence against Women and Children Campaign, the work of protecting women and children from gender-based violence, is no longer the sole purview of Government and NGOs, but is also a deep seated societal problem. To bring an end to what it calls ‘The Shadow Pandemic’ by 2030, the United Nations, through its Orange the World campaign, has called upon the world’s population to take practical steps in what is a growing global crisis.

This call to action by the UN and the South African government has been the spirit behind the CCBSA Men of Honour Movement. The movement is aimed at supporting men to not only be aware of the underlying drivers of abuse in their own lives, but to turn them into ‘advocates for change’ in their areas of influence. The Men of Honour Movement is a microcosm of the complex social circumstances affecting South African men. Indeed, the 16 Days of Activism is vital, as well as the work being done by bodies such as the United Nations around the world.

First launched in 2019 CCBSA Managing Director, Velaphi Ratshefola, Men of Honour by is a call-to-action for men to start looking within themselves in a meaningful way on the key issues related to gender-based violence that South Africa faces.

“We kicked off with monthly group sessions hosted nationally, where I personally travelled with a small team to our 12 sites around the country. We hosted groups of around 70 people in each session, discussing issues that range from work challenges, home pressures, parenting, and personal emotional health”, says Ratshefola

“In 2020, with the onset of the pandemic, we had to move these sessions online, using our internal teleconferencing network. The tension triggered by the pandemic and lockdowns was palpable, and these interactive online sessions proved more relevant than ever, with an average of 300 people per session from each of our regions and the largest attendance being over 500 people in one session” adds Ratshefola

These platforms offered an opportunity to the men working at CCBSA, which has almost 8000 employees in South Africa, to reflect on themselves and each other in a deep, meaningful way that leaves a lasting impact.

The initiative has received overwhelmingly positive feedback throughout the organisation, from both women and men, with requests for its expansion, so that each region can continue running smaller sessions without depending on head office.

One key success of Men of honour is that it has become a haven for men to talk amongst each other, to ask questions and to allow themselves to be vulnerable and ask for help. “It is a safe space that has been created for men, to engage and while doing so, become more aware of their actions and attitudes towards women in and outside the organisation. Some men have admitted that their actions were a result of how they grew up and the society in which they adopted certain behaviours”, Ratshefola said.

Many also noted that, most of the time, they were not even aware that some of these learned behaviours were offensive. The introspection has helped them to be more aware of their behaviour and act in a befitting manner towards women in general. “Some of the men report that through the work they are doing for themselves and the positive changes they are seeing, they have started offering guidance to other men struggling with the same issues in their communities. These anecdotes make me even more determined to continue with this programme”, Ratshefola noted. There have been increasing calls to combine Men of Honour with [email protected], a similar network launched in 2018 where women in the company connect with each other and access resources and tools, case studies and practical guides to help advance their careers and attain a meaningful work-life balance.

While a special combined conference would undoubtedly be popular, and something we are strongly considering, we have clearly seen that providing a safe space for men to let their guards down and be sincere promises massive social benefits.

Common sense dictates that a genuinely happier organisation, where people feel they are offered a platform to be heard, leads to lowered tensions, healthier communication, and higher productivity.

However, each individual and organisation can make a bigger difference, not only by raising awareness during a certain part of the year, but by looking inwards every day. We need to be the change we so desperately need to finally conquer the scourge of gender-based violence for the sake of future generations of women in our great nation.

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

The Coca-Cola System in Kenya, in partnership with like-minded institutions: County Government of Laikipia Women Enterprise Fund (WEF) Absa and Amref Health Africa in Kenya have today launched an initiative to support small and micro business outlets across the country to recover and reopen after the COVID-19 impact on the economy that saw most of them lose revenue and close.

The support is targeting 18,000 trade outlets across the country who will receive personal protective equipment including masks and faceshields, handwashing jerrycans, sanitizers, and garden furniture to enable them to enforce the required social distancing. They will also be provided with communication and awareness materials related to COVID-19 safety and precautions.

Speaking during the launch in Nairobi, Phillipine Mtikitiki, Vice President and General Manager, Coca-Cola East & Central Africa Franchise said: “Over the last few months we have been focusing on the health and safety of our employees and communities. We are now extending our support to local economies and micro-small businesses. The closure of the economy at the time was the correct action to take to curb the spread of the virus, and we commend the Government of Kenya. To help those who have always been at the heart of our social fabric but had to temporarily close, we as a system, have committed Kshs 125 million towards supporting our trade partners and waste collectors, eateries, restaurants, bars and kiosks”.

Under the initiative, the traders and their staff will also benefit from COVID-19 health and safety training provided by Amref Health, to help them adhere to business opening and operating guidelines as per government directives. Absa, the financial business partner will facilitate access to business loans to the traders that require working capital to revive their enterprises, including restocking.

While speaking at the event, Absa Regional Corporate Director for East Africa, James Agin, explained that under this partnership, the bank shall support affected businesses across the entire value chain with revolving short-term working capital financing to bridge any cashflow challenges between stock purchase and receipt of payment from their customers. “We will offer small and medium businesses unsecured loans of up to 10 million shillings which is the highest in the market, as well as LPO financing and invoice discounting of up to 50 million shilling amongst other benefits. We will also offer insurance and asset-based financing. This will allow the distributors and retailers the flexibility to accept extended payment terms from manufacturers as well as increase their credit should they require it,” he added. 2 Classified – Confidential

“We are delighted to be part of this noble initiative that will contribute to ensuring that our economy starts to grow again and that businesses comply to national health and safety guidelines. Our role in this initiative is to empower traders with the knowledge that enables them to operate safely while ensuring they maintain a safe space for their customers. This will be done through an easy to understand training curriculum and application of a set standard of operating procedures,” said Dr. Meshack Ndirangu, Amref Health Africa in Kenya Country Director.

The initiative has partnered with the County Government of Laikipia’s Economic stimulus programme to provide trade finance to the county’s distributors and retailers. Hon. Ndiritu Muriithi, Governor, County Government of Laikipia, emphasized: “The retailers under this Coca- Cola scheme operating in Laikipia are eligible for business loans to help them restock and accelerate recovery from COVID-19 pandemic and will benefit from County Government of Laikipia’s interest cost subsidy of up to 5%. The county has already committed Kshs 123 million to the Economic Stimulus program, of which Kshs 73 million will cater for the interest cost subsidy.”

Eng. Charles Mwirigi, WEF CEO, underscored: “to complement the efforts by Coca-Cola, the Fund has committed over Kshs. 2 billion to provide affordable and relevant loans to support women traders besides business skills training to enable them to bounce back from the impact of Covid-19 pandemic.”

Small traders and waste collectors across the country have experienced unprecedented losses occasioned by the effects of the Coronavirus that continues to spread across the world. These losses have subjected households and families, and our environment to numerous challenges. “We will continue to prioritise initiatives that support our traders as they reopen for business and we are already rolling out some initial support that will be augmented by what we are officially launching today. The response from our trade partners has so far has been very positive, and we hope that in the coming months they will regain consumer confidence and record more business,” said Xavier Selga, Managing Director, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa – Kenya.

“Many people and our environment has suffered during this pandemic. Investing back into the ‘small giants’ of our country, those micro and small businesses that are the backbone of Kenya’s resilience, is the least we could do. And we are humbled and honoured to be joined by other like-minded organisations to bring their services and skills to support those who need it most. Together, we believe we can emerge stronger and create a better shared future’, concluded Mtikitiki. – ENDS –

THE Coca-Cola System commits KSHS 125 Million to Kenya’s economic & environmental recovery from COVID-19

Like-minded organisations join the cause to uplift and build Kenya’s micro and small business enterprises

The Coca-Cola System in Kenya, in partnership with like-minded institutions Laikipia County, Women Enterprise Fund (WEF), Absa, and Amref Health Africa in Kenya has today launched an initiative to support small and micro business outlets across the country to recover and reopen after the COVID-19 impact on the economy that saw most of them lose revenue and close.

Speaking during the launch in Nairobi, Phillipine Mtikitiki, Vice President and General Manager, Coca-Cola East & Central Africa Franchise said: “Over the last few months we have been focusing on the health and safety of our employees and communities. We are now extending our support to our local economies and micro-small businesses. The closure of the economy at the time was the correct action to curb the spread of the virus, and we commend the Government of Kenya. To help those who have always been at the heart of our social fabric but had to temporarily close through the months of lockdown, we as a system, have commited Kshs 125 million towards supporting our trade partners and waste collectors, eateries, restaurants, bars and kiosks”.

The support is targetting 18,000 trade outlets across the country who will receive personal protective equipment including masks and faceshields, handwashing jerrycans, sanitizers, and garden furniture to enable them to enforce the required social distancing. They will also be provided with communication and awareness materials related to COVID-19 safety and precautions.

Hon.Ndiritu Muriithi, Laikipia County Governor, emphasized: “In addition to Coca-Cola’s support to our traders, the county is partnering with various financial institutions to provide traders with a working capital injection on the realization that the key barrier to trade is affordable loans. Absa will provide business loans, which the Laikipia Government will support traders to offset at 0.5% of the interest amount. The county has already committed Kshs 70 million towards this.

Under the initiative, the traders and their staff will also benefit from COVID-19 health and safety training provided by Amref Health, to help them adhere to government business opening and operating guidelines. Absa, the financial business partner will facilitate access to business loans to the traders that require working capital to revive their enterprises, including restocking.

“We are delighted to be part of this noble initiative that will contribute to ensuring that our economy starts to grow again and that businesses comply to national health and safety guidelines. Our role in this initiative is to empower traders with the knowledge that enables them to operate safely while ensuring they maintain a safe space for their customers. This will be done through an easy to understand and adopt training curriculum and application of a set standard of operating procedures,” said Dr. Meshack Ndirangu, Amref Country Director, Kenya.

Small traders and waste collectors across the country have experienced unprecedented losses occasioned by the effects of the Coronavirus that continues to spread across the world. These losses have subjected households and families, and our environment to numerous challenges.

“We will continue to prioritise initiatives that support our traders as they reopen for business and we are already rolling out some initial support that will be augmented by what we are officially launching today. The response from our trade partners has so far has been very positive, and we hope that in the coming months they will regain consumer confidence and record more business,” said Xavier Selga, Managing Director, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa – Kenya.

“Many people and our environment have suffered during this pandemic. Investing back into the ‘small giants’ of our country, those micro and small businesses that are the backbone of Kenya’s resilience, is the least we could do. And we are humbled and honoured to be joined by other like-minded organisations to bring their services and skills to support those who need it most. Together, we believe we can emerge stronger and create a better shared future’, concluded Mtikitiki.

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

CCBSA rolls out Sixteen Bizniz in a Box container businesses in the West Rand

Gauteng, 07th October 2020 – As the South African economy continues to steadily reopen, Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) has rolled out sixteen township shipping container businesses in Merafong Municipality, Gauteng. This forms part of the company’s Youth Empowerment Programme (YEP), which works to foster entrepreneurship and economic opportunities in underprivileged communities.

In June 2020, following the brief suspension of the programme due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the programme resumed with sites earmarked in Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Gauteng.

“These businesses will bring much-needed jobs in a community that has been persistently economically distressed, and more so now as a result of the pandemic,” says Nozicelo Ngcobo – Public Affairs, Communication & Sustainability Director, CCBSA. “In addition to direct employment, they will stimulate the secondary economy, including a variety of product suppliers, service providers and increased foot-traffic which will naturally attract symbiotic businesses.”

The rollout is the culmination of a national process that began in 2018, when a series of townhall sessions were conducted, followed by applications by interested young entrepreneurs.

In Gauteng (Merafong and Ekurhuleni) alone, a total of 68 applicants were chosen to participate in a rigorous training programme. Of this group25 of the most committed candidates were ultimately allocated container businesses which include equipment and stock, all to the value of R175 000. The businesses range from fast food outlets, grocery store, car wash with shisanyama and internet cafe. Each of these businesses are expected to employ one or two other people to assist with running operations.

“These enterprises will have a meaningful impact on the local economy as they are tailored to both the needs of the community, as well as the personal interests of each of the candidates,” says Ngcobo.

Following the launch in Merafong, CCBSA is preparing for its next Bizniz in a Box rollouts in Bushbukridge in Mpumalanga and Newcastle in KwaZulu-Natal. This will be unveiled towards the end of 2020 or early 2021.

To date, CCBSA and its partners have trained more than 700 young entrepreneurs and helped 140 of them take their businesses to the next level, creating 68 additional jobs through employing shop assistants. CCBSA aims to develop more viable, successful youth entrepreneurs by 2021, creating new hope for young people in townships.

“With each new community that we implement the project in, we document the things that worked and those that posed challenges,” says Ngcobo. “This enables the programme to be more effective, from the application and training phases, all the way to when we hand over the keys to the business, so each entrepreneur has a much higher chance of sustainable success over the long-term.”

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

WASTE RECLAIMERS SAFETY PRIORITISED

At a handover ceremony held at the Brixton Church on Monday, 28 September 2020, Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) donated gadgets, personal protective equipment (PPE) and other vital essentials to inner city-based waste reclaimers.

In an investment amounting to R232 000, CCBSA sponsored four Samsung Galaxy A30s phones and four Lenovo Core i5 Processor laptops, which will be used by the African Reclaimers Organisation (ARO), a Johannesburg-based non-profit association of informal waste reclaimers who collect recyclables. Fabric cloth masks, grocery vouchers and care kits, which include sanitiser liquid and other essentials, were provided directly to ARO member waste pickers.

“Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown, we focused our efforts on providing much-needed support for communities most affected by the outbreak,” said CCBSA Public Affairs, Communication and Sustainability Director, Nozicelo Ngcobo. “We had a special focus on waste reclaimers, as they form a critical part of our efforts to help recover product packaging from the environment.”

Waste reclaimers, who earn a livelihood from the complex and have the arduous task of managing recyclable waste, are especially at risk of infection, but have limited access to sanitisers and other protective equipment to keep them safe.

As an integral part of the country’s recycling value chain, they were amongst the worst affected during the State mandated lockdowns and needed help to keep going while they waited to return to work.

“In working with our partners, we are dedicating focused time and energy into providing as much meaningful support as we can,” Ngcobo says. “As one of the largest producers of beverage packaging in the economy, it is our responsibility to ensure the proper implementation of Covid-19 safety guidelines across our ecosystem by providing the essentials where required.”

During the course of the pandemic, CCBSA provided further community support across the country, including food, blanket, face mask and PPE donations to vulnerable communities in Gauteng, Free State, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and the North West Province.

In addition to the waste reclaimers, a total of 4050 households were supported across these areas in an investment of over R865 000.

“While waste reclaimers received a special focus in the bulk of our efforts, we identified the areas of greatest need in four of the most vulnerable regions across South Africa,” Ngcobo said. “To limit infection, we recognised that we have to support everyone in the community to enhance health, hygiene and economic upliftment as we all return to our lives.”

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

CCBSA handing over state-of-the art trolleys to Durban beachfront hawkers

As part of its journey to transform its supply chain, Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is handing over 35 state-of-the art cool drink trolleys to Durban beachfront hawkers. The outlay, a partnership with the Ethekwini Municipality, forms part of the latest extension of CCBSA’s R1.5 million project, initiated in 2019 to support mobile vendors, create jobs in the area and expand the company’s supply chain network.

“As the economy re-opens and millions of people make their way to the Durban beach during the summer festive season, our beach hawkers will play a vital role in bringing refreshment to leisure seekers,” says Michael Tsholo, General Manager for Coastal Region, CCBSA. “These trolleys will empower hawkers to generate much-needed income while ensuring that the product is distributed in a safe way, as they will adhere to strict safety and hygiene guidelines.”

In addition to the 35 cool drink mobile trolleys, with a 120-litre capacity each, the rollout has been accompanied by training for informal traders, which attracted 117 attendees. While 105 hawkers in the Durban central business district have already received 75-litre trolleys, the larger sized versions feature specifications adapted for beach conditions and the nature of work, which is different from the city environment.

Hawkers will also receive a branded umbrella, a branded bib, free ice and a trade discount. As part of the programme, a hawker distributor has been appointed to the district to streamline distribution of product and ice daily, delivering to the hawkers at their hotspots, which are mostly situated around taxi ranks.

“These high-quality trolleys, along with the support structure, will be critical in helping us be more efficient and profitable in our businesses,” says Mthokozisi Mthembu, one of the 35 beachfront hawkers receiving trolleys. “Being part of an internationally recognised company, the training we receive gives us an advantage when we serve customers.”

CCBSA has an extensive supply chain network, which includes formal and informal small businesses. The company provides support to small and medium enterprises (SMEs) through several channels, including truck driver owners distributing to the formal market through its Owner Driver (OD) programme, warehouse operators distributing to the informal market such as spaza shops and taverns through its Local Distribution Partnership (LDP) programme. Its Youth Empowerment Programme (YEP) uplifts township youth and women through the Bizniz in a Box container business enterprise development programme and informal hawkers (vendors) are supported, along with direct support for existing spaza shops and taverns.

“When we launched in 2016 and set out to be a level 2 B-BBEE contributor by 2021, we didn’t want to only transform one part of our business through ownership, as is often the practice,” says Tsholo. “We set out the vision of empowering and transforming our entire business to the highest executive positions, and just as importantly to empower our entire supply chain from the wholesale level all the way down to the street vendor level, creating meaningful sustainable jobs.”

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) is a proudly South African company which began operating as a legal entity in July 2016, after the merger of six non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations. We employ over 7000 people at 13 manufacturing facilities across the country.

As a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) and a bottler for The Coca-Cola Company, our vision is to refresh Africa every day and make our continent a better place for all. We manufacture and distribute Coca-Cola beverages that make life’s everyday moments more enjoyable, while doing business the right way. The result is shared opportunity for our customers, our employees, our communities, and our shareholders.

We conduct our business ethically, transparently and conscientiously. We espouse an inclusive business culture to reflect our African identity. We accelerate sustainable, profitable revenue growth across all categories and offer an innovative portfolio of products that respond to customer needs and consumer preferences. Profitability is important, but not at any cost. People matter. Our planet matters. We do business the right way by following our values and partnering for solutions that benefit us all.

The Coca-Cola System commits USD 17m across Africa in response to COVID-19

“In this Together” – The Coca-Cola System and The Coca-Cola Foundation commit approximately USD 17m across Africa in response to COVID-19

Across Africa and in partnership with NGOs, Coca-Cola in Africa, and its bottling partners (the “Coca-Cola System”) and The Coca-Cola Foundation (TCCF), have been deploying a range of resources, including capabilities, funds and products to support governments, communities and local economies in their urgent efforts to contain the spread and impact of the Coronavirus since its outbreak on the continent.

The Coca-Cola System is committing US$13million to support the continent through the various phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, The Coca-Cola Foundation (TCCF) has granted just under $4 million to international and local NGOs, such as the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Amref Health to procure and distribute personal protective equipment (PPEs) and other critical needs for frontline workers and to help fund ICU-enabled ambulances for example in Mauritius and Madagascar.

The Coca-Cola system also donated to National Solidarity Funds in South Africa, Morocco and Djibouti and additional funds were allocated to boost awareness and mobilization to help stem infections in vulnerable communities across several countries.

In addition to suspending all commercial advertising of its brands and deploying its marketing and trade assets, including social media channels, product labels and point-of-sale materials, to amplify COVID-19 messaging, the Coca-Cola System is providing funding and other forms of support to help bolster the micro, small and medium enterprises in the retail, hospitality and recycling sectors, who have been among the hardest hit businesses across countries. Coca-Cola company is also working with some NGOs and social enterprises, including Givefood.ng in Nigeria, Gift of the Givers in South Africa and National Disaster Management agencies to provide food parcels for vulnerable families whose livelihood has been disrupted by the lockdown and other restrictions.

Coca-Cola’s bottling partners on the continent, on their part, are making significant contributions to the fight against the pandemic through a variety of interventions, including lending their distribution capability to help deliver medical supplies, food parcels, 3-D printed face masks and other PPE as well as donating cash, beverage products and food items. In response to the critical need for the hand sanitizer, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa in Uganda and Ethiopia, Bralima in DRC, Les Brasseries du Congo in Congo, and Nigerian Bottling Company in Nigeria have deployed their technical expertise and facilities to produce over 30,000 litres of alcoholic sanitizer in line with World Health Organization (WHO) standard which were distributed to governments and vulnerable communities free of charge.

“Our deepest sympathies go out to all those impacted by this virus and their families. We are leveraging on the experience and capabilities the Coca-Cola System has built in over 90 years of serving consumers and making a difference across Africa, in the planning and deployment of our resources to effectively support governments in the efforts to contain the spread, support vulnerable communities and get local economies back up and running,” explains Bruno Pietracci, President of Africa & Middle East for The Coca-Cola Company.

In some countries such as in Eswatini, Ethiopia, Uganda and Zimbabwe, Coca-Cola in Africa provided its marketing expertise either directly or through its partnership with Project Last Mile, to support Ministries of Health simplify and amplify health and safety messages. Additionally, in Egypt, Coca-Cola decorated its bottles with messages of gratitude and appreciation to every doctor in the country’s “white army”.

The Coca-Cola system has leveraged its years of experience in water access, sanitation and hygiene through the Replenish Africa Initiative (RAIN) to develop unique emergency handwashing stations (some foot operated, some using jerrycans), which are now set up in high traffic areas, border points and in vulnerable communities.

“The Coca-Cola system has been through many global crises during our 134 year’s history. Making a positive difference during times of crisis is in our DNA. We are in this together with our communities. Going forward, supporting micro and small businesses who are the fabric of our communities and the backbone to Africa’s resilience, will be a key priority for us,” added Pietracci.

The Coca-Cola Company

The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is a total beverage company, offering over 500 brands in more than 200 countries and territories. In addition to the company’s Coca-Cola brand, our portfolio includes AdeS, Ayataka, Costa, Dasani, Del Valle, Fanta, Georgia, Gold Peak, Honest, innocent, Minute Maid, Powerade, Simply, smartwater, Sprite, vitaminwater and ZICO. We’re constantly transforming our portfolio, from reducing sugar in our drinks to bringing innovative new products to market. We’re also working to reduce our environmental impact by replenishing water and promoting recycling. With our bottling partners, we employ more than 700,000 people, helping bring economic opportunity to local communities worldwide. Learn more at Coca-Cola Journey at www.coca-colacompany.com and follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn.

About The Coca-Cola Foundation

The Coca-Cola Foundation is the global philanthropic arm of The Coca-Cola Company. Since its inception in 1984, The Foundation has awarded more than $1 billion in grants to support sustainable community initiatives around the world. For more information about The Coca-Cola Foundation, please visit: https://www.coca-colacompany.com/foundation

About Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA)

CCBA bottles and distributes beverages whose trademarks are owned by The Coca-Cola Company (TCCC) or TCCC’s affiliated entities and is the world’s 8th largest Coca-Cola bottler by revenue. CCBA has over 16 000 employees across its operations in Africa with almost 40 bottling plants in 13 countries.

The creation of CCBA in 2016 was designed to advance a consolidated, more successful Coca-Cola system on the continent, and also in Ethiopia.

Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBA) accounts for about 40% of all Coca-Cola volumes sold in Africa.

CCBA began its operations as a legal entity from July 2016 having been created as a direct result of a merger between non-alcoholic ready to drink bottling operations of The Coca-Cola Company, (then) SABMiller and the Gutsche Family Investments.

CCBA shareholders now are: The Coca-Cola Company 66.5% and Gutsche Family Investments 33.5%.

CCBA boasts a diverse pan-African footprint servicing over 650 000 outlets that serve a combined population of over 249 million people across the continent.

Our operations in sub-Saharan Africa comprise the following markets: South Africa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Namibia, Ghana, Mayotte, the Comoros, Botswana, Zambia and most recently, Eswatini.

CCBA is a world-class, customer-orientated, socially and environmentally conscious fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) company. Sales and distribution excellence are our core strengths.

Aligned with The Coca-Cola Company’s 2020 Vision, CCBA is pursuing an ambitious growth strategy that will be supported through investment in manufacturing, sales, distribution and marketing.

CCBA aspires to refresh Africa every day and to make the continent a better place for all.


Contents

19th century historical origins

Confederate Colonel John Pemberton, wounded in the American Civil War and addicted to morphine, also had a medical degree and began a quest to find a substitute for the problematic drug. [6] In 1885 at Pemberton's Eagle Drug and Chemical House, his drugstore in Columbus, Georgia, he registered Pemberton's French Wine Coca nerve tonic. [7] [8] [9] [10] Pemberton's tonic may have been inspired by the formidable success of Vin Mariani, a French-Corsican coca wine, [11] but his recipe additionally included the African kola nut, the beverage's source of caffeine. [12]

It is also worth noting that a Spanish drink called "Kola Coca" was presented at a contest in Philadelphia in 1885, a year before the official birth of Coca-Cola. The rights for this Spanish drink were bought by Coca-Cola in 1953. [13]

In 1886, when Atlanta and Fulton County passed prohibition legislation, Pemberton responded by developing Coca-Cola, a nonalcoholic version of Pemberton's French Wine Coca. [14] It was marketed as "Coca-Cola: The temperance drink", which appealed to many people as the temperance movement enjoyed wide support during this time. [1] The first sales were at Jacob's Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8, 1886, [15] where it initially sold for five cents a glass. [16] Drugstore soda fountains were popular in the United States at the time due to the belief that carbonated water was good for the health, [17] and Pemberton's new drink was marketed and sold as a patent medicine, Pemberton claiming it a cure for many diseases, including morphine addiction, indigestion, nerve disorders, headaches, and impotence. Pemberton ran the first advertisement for the beverage on May 29 of the same year in the Atlanta Journal. [18]

By 1888, three versions of Coca-Cola – sold by three separate businesses – were on the market. A co-partnership had been formed on January 14, 1888, between Pemberton and four Atlanta businessmen: J.C. Mayfield, A.O. Murphey, C.O. Mullahy, and E.H. Bloodworth. Not codified by any signed document, a verbal statement given by Asa Candler years later asserted under testimony that he had acquired a stake in Pemberton's company as early as 1887. [19] John Pemberton declared that the name "Coca-Cola" belonged to his son, Charley, but the other two manufacturers could continue to use the formula. [20]

Charley Pemberton's record of control over the "Coca-Cola" name was the underlying factor that allowed for him to participate as a major shareholder in the March 1888 Coca-Cola Company incorporation filing made in his father's place. [21] Charley's exclusive control over the "Coca-Cola" name became a continual thorn in Asa Candler's side. Candler's oldest son, Charles Howard Candler, authored a book in 1950 published by Emory University. In this definitive biography about his father, Candler specifically states: " on April 14, 1888, the young druggist Asa Griggs Candler purchased a one-third interest in the formula of an almost completely unknown proprietary elixir known as Coca-Cola." [22] The deal was actually between John Pemberton's son Charley and Walker, Candler & Co. – with John Pemberton acting as cosigner for his son. For $50 down and $500 in 30 days, Walker, Candler & Co. obtained all of the one-third interest in the Coca-Cola Company that Charley held, all while Charley still held on to the name. After the April 14 deal, on April 17, 1888, one-half of the Walker/Dozier interest shares were acquired by Candler for an additional $750. [23]

Company

In 1892, Candler set out to incorporate a second company "The Coca-Cola Company" (the current corporation). When Candler had the earliest records of the "Coca-Cola Company" destroyed in 1910, the action was claimed to have been made during a move to new corporation offices around this time. [24]

After Candler had gained a better foothold on Coca-Cola in April 1888, he nevertheless was forced to sell the beverage he produced with the recipe he had under the names "Yum Yum" and "Koke". This was while Charley Pemberton was selling the elixir, although a cruder mixture, under the name "Coca-Cola", all with his father's blessing. After both names failed to catch on for Candler, by the middle of 1888, the Atlanta pharmacist was quite anxious to establish a firmer legal claim to Coca-Cola, and hoped he could force his two competitors, Walker and Dozier, completely out of the business, as well. [23]

John Pemberton died suddenly on August 16, 1888. Asa Candler then decided to move swiftly forward to attain full control of the entire Coca-Cola operation.

Charley Pemberton, an alcoholic and opium addict, unnerved Asa Candler more than anyone else. Candler is said to have quickly maneuvered to purchase the exclusive rights to the name "Coca-Cola" from Pemberton's son Charley immediately after he learned of Dr. Pemberton's death. One of several stories states that Candler approached Charley's mother at John Pemberton's funeral and offered her $300 in cash for the title to the name. Charley Pemberton was found on June 23, 1894, unconscious, with a stick of opium by his side. Ten days later, Charley died at Atlanta's Grady Hospital at the age of 40. [25]

In Charles Howard Candler's 1950 book about his father, he stated: "On August 30 [1888], he Asa Candler became the sole proprietor of Coca-Cola, a fact which was stated on letterheads, invoice blanks and advertising copy." [26]

With this action on August 30, 1888, Candler's sole control became technically all true. Candler had negotiated with Margaret Dozier and her brother Woolfolk Walker a full payment amounting to $1,000, which all agreed Candler could pay off with a series of notes over a specified time span. By May 1, 1889, Candler was now claiming full ownership of the Coca-Cola beverage, with a total investment outlay by Candler for the drink enterprise over the years amounting to $2,300. [27]

In 1914, Margaret Dozier, as co-owner of the original Coca-Cola Company in 1888, came forward to claim that her signature on the 1888 Coca-Cola Company bill of sale had been forged. Subsequent analysis of other similar transfer documents had also indicated John Pemberton's signature had most likely been forged as well, which some accounts claim was precipitated by his son Charley. [20]

On September 12, 1919, Coca-Cola Co. was purchased by a group of investors for $25 million and reincorporated in Delaware. The company publicly offered 500,000 shares of the company for $40 a share. [28] [29]

In 1986, The Coca-Cola Company merged with two of their bottling operators (owned by JTL Corporation and BCI Holding Corporation) to form Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. (CCE). [30]

In December 1991, Coca-Cola Enterprises merged with the Johnston Coca-Cola Bottling Group, Inc. [30]

Origins of bottling

The first bottling of Coca-Cola occurred in Vicksburg, Mississippi, at the Biedenharn Candy Company on March 12, 1894. [31] The proprietor of the bottling works was Joseph A. Biedenharn. [32] The original bottles were Hutchinson bottles, very different from the much later hobble-skirt design of 1915 now so familiar.

A few years later two entrepreneurs from Chattanooga, Tennessee, namely Benjamin F. Thomas and Joseph B. Whitehead, proposed the idea of bottling and were so persuasive that Candler signed a contract giving them control of the procedure for only one dollar. Candler later realized that he had made a grave mistake. [33] Candler never collected his dollar, but in 1899, Chattanooga became the site of the first Coca-Cola bottling company. Candler remained very content just selling his company's syrup. [34] The loosely termed contract proved to be problematic for The Coca-Cola Company for decades to come. Legal matters were not helped by the decision of the bottlers to subcontract to other companies, effectively becoming parent bottlers. [35] This contract specified that bottles would be sold at 5¢ each and had no fixed duration, leading to the fixed price of Coca-Cola from 1886 to 1959.

20th century

The first outdoor wall advertisement that promoted the Coca-Cola drink was painted in 1894 in Cartersville, Georgia. [36] Cola syrup was sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement for upset stomach. [37] [38] By the time of its 50th anniversary, the soft drink had reached the status of a national icon in the US. In 1935, it was certified kosher by Atlanta Rabbi Tobias Geffen with the help of Harold Hirsch, Geffen was the first person to see the top-secret ingredients list after facing scrutiny from the American Jewish population regarding the drink's kosher status, [39] consequently the company made minor changes in the sourcing of some ingredients so it could continue to be consumed by Americas Jewish population and during Passover. [40]

The longest running commercial Coca-Cola soda fountain anywhere was Atlanta's Fleeman's Pharmacy, which first opened its doors in 1914. [41] Jack Fleeman took over the pharmacy from his father and ran it until 1995 closing it after 81 years. [42] On July 12, 1944, the one-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup was manufactured by The Coca-Cola Company. Cans of Coke first appeared in 1955. [43]

New Coke

On April 23, 1985, Coca-Cola, amid much publicity, attempted to change the formula of the drink with "New Coke". Follow-up taste tests revealed most consumers preferred the taste of New Coke to both Coke and Pepsi [44] but Coca-Cola management was unprepared for the public's nostalgia for the old drink, leading to a backlash. The company gave in to protests and returned to the old formula under the name Coca-Cola Classic, on July 10, 1985. "New Coke" remained available and was renamed Coke II in 1992 it was discontinued in 2002.

21st century

On July 5, 2005, it was revealed that Coca-Cola would resume operations in Iraq for the first time since the Arab League boycotted the company in 1968. [45]

In April 2007, in Canada, the name "Coca-Cola Classic" was changed back to "Coca-Cola". The word "Classic" was removed because "New Coke" was no longer in production, eliminating the need to differentiate between the two. [46] The formula remained unchanged. In January 2009, Coca-Cola stopped printing the word "Classic" on the labels of 16-US-fluid-ounce (470 ml) bottles sold in parts of the southeastern United States. [47] The change is part of a larger strategy to rejuvenate the product's image. [47] The word "Classic" was removed from all Coca-Cola products by 2011.

In November 2009, due to a dispute over wholesale prices of Coca-Cola products, Costco stopped restocking its shelves with Coke and Diet Coke for two months a separate pouring rights deal in 2013 saw Coke products removed from Costco food courts in favor of Pepsi. [48] Some Costco locations (such as the ones in Tucson, Arizona) additionally sell imported Coca-Cola from Mexico with cane sugar instead of corn syrup from separate distributors. [49] Coca-Cola introduced the 7.5-ounce mini-can in 2009, and on September 22, 2011, the company announced price reductions, asking retailers to sell eight-packs for $2.99. That same day, Coca-Cola announced the 12.5-ounce bottle, to sell for 89 cents. A 16-ounce bottle has sold well at 99 cents since being re-introduced, but the price was going up to $1.19. [50]

In 2012, Coca-Cola resumed business in Myanmar after 60 years of absence due to U.S.-imposed investment sanctions against the country. [51] [52] Coca-Cola's bottling plant will be located in Yangon and is part of the company's five-year plan and $200 million investment in Myanmar. [53] Coca-Cola with its partners is to invest US$5 billion in its operations in India by 2020. [54] In 2013, it was announced that Coca-Cola Life would be introduced in Argentina and other parts of the world that would contain stevia and sugar. [55] However, the drink was discontinued in Britain in June 2017. [56]

On January 25, 2021, the company announced it would be launching Coca-Cola with Coffee and Coca-Cola with Coffee Zero Sugar nationwide in the United States. [57] The product would be available in three flavors – Dark Blend, Vanilla and Caramel – while the zero-sugar, zero-calorie version comes in Dark Blend and Vanilla.

In February 2021, as a plan to combat the plastic waste, Coca-Cola said that it will start selling its sodas in bottles made from 100% recycled plastic material in the United States and is planning to recycle by 2030 one bottle or can for each one it sells. [58] Coca-Cola is starting by selling 2000 paper bottles to see if they hold up due to the risk of safety and of changing the taste of the drink. [59]

Ingredients

  • Carbonated water
  • Sugar (sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) depending on country of origin)
  • Natural flavorings [60]

A typical can of Coca-Cola (12 fl ounces/355 ml) contains 38 grams of sugar (usually in the form of HFCS), [61] 50 mg of sodium, 0 grams fat, 0 grams potassium, and 140 calories. [62] On May 5, 2014, Coca-Cola said it is working to remove a controversial ingredient, brominated vegetable oil, from all of its drinks. [63]

Formula of natural flavorings

The exact formula of Coca-Cola's natural flavorings (but not its other ingredients, which are listed on the side of the bottle or can) is a trade secret. The original copy of the formula was held in SunTrust Bank's main vault in Atlanta for 86 years. Its predecessor, the Trust Company, was the underwriter for the Coca-Cola Company's initial public offering in 1919. On December 8, 2011, the original secret formula was moved from the vault at SunTrust Banks to a new vault containing the formula which will be on display for visitors to its World of Coca-Cola museum in downtown Atlanta. [64]

According to Snopes, a popular myth states that only two executives have access to the formula, with each executive having only half the formula. [65] However, several sources state that while Coca-Cola does have a rule restricting access to only two executives, each knows the entire formula and others, in addition to the prescribed duo, have known the formulation process. [66]

On February 11, 2011, Ira Glass said on his PRI radio show, This American Life, that TAL staffers had found a recipe in "Everett Beal's Recipe Book", reproduced in the February 28, 1979, issue of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, that they believed was either Pemberton's original formula for Coca-Cola, or a version that he made either before or after the product hit the market in 1886. The formula basically matched the one found in Pemberton's diary. [67] [68] [69] Coca-Cola archivist Phil Mooney acknowledged that the recipe "could be a precursor" to the formula used in the original 1886 product, but emphasized that Pemberton's original formula is not the same as the one used in the current product. [70]

Use of stimulants in formula

When launched, Coca-Cola's two key ingredients were cocaine and caffeine. The cocaine was derived from the coca leaf and the caffeine from kola nut (also spelled "cola nut" at the time), leading to the name Coca-Cola. [71] [72]

Coca leaf

Pemberton called for five ounces of coca leaf per gallon of syrup (approximately 37 g/L), a significant dose in 1891, Candler claimed his formula (altered extensively from Pemberton's original) contained only a tenth of this amount. Coca-Cola once contained an estimated nine milligrams of cocaine per glass. (For comparison, a typical dose or "line" of cocaine is 50–75 mg. [73] ) In 1903, it was removed. [74]

After 1904, instead of using fresh leaves, Coca-Cola started using "spent" leaves – the leftovers of the cocaine-extraction process with trace levels of cocaine. [75] Since then, Coca-Cola has used a cocaine-free coca leaf extract. Today, that extract is prepared at a Stepan Company plant in Maywood, New Jersey, the only manufacturing plant authorized by the federal government to import and process coca leaves, which it obtains from Peru and Bolivia. [76] Stepan Company extracts cocaine from the coca leaves, which it then sells to Mallinckrodt, the only company in the United States licensed to purify cocaine for medicinal use. [77]

Long after the syrup had ceased to contain any significant amount of cocaine, in the southeastern U.S., "dope" remained a common colloquialism for Coca-Cola, and "dope-wagons" were trucks that transported it. [78]

Kola nuts for caffeine

Kola nuts act as a flavoring and the original source of caffeine in Coca-Cola. Kola nuts contain about 2.0 to 3.5% caffeine, and has a bitter flavor.

In 1911, the U.S. government sued in United States v. Forty Barrels and Twenty Kegs of Coca-Cola, hoping to force the Coca-Cola Company to remove caffeine from its formula. The court found that the syrup, when diluted as directed, would result in a beverage containing 1.21 grains (or 78.4 mg) of caffeine per 8 US fluid ounces (240 ml) serving. [79] The case was decided in favor of the Coca-Cola Company at the district court, but subsequently in 1912, the U.S. Pure Food and Drug Act was amended, adding caffeine to the list of "habit-forming" and "deleterious" substances which must be listed on a product's label. In 1913 the case was appealed to the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati, where the ruling was affirmed, but then appealed again in 1916 to the Supreme Court, where the government effectively won as a new trial was ordered. The company then voluntarily reduced the amount of caffeine in its product, and offered to pay the government's legal costs to settle and avoid further litigation.

Coca-Cola contains 34 mg of caffeine per 12 fluid ounces (9.8 mg per 100 ml). [80]

Franchised production model

The actual production and distribution of Coca-Cola follows a franchising model. The Coca-Cola Company only produces a syrup concentrate, which it sells to bottlers throughout the world, who hold Coca-Cola franchises for one or more geographical areas. The bottlers produce the final drink by mixing the syrup with filtered water and sweeteners, putting the mixture into cans and bottles, and carbonating it, which the bottlers then sell and distribute to retail stores, vending machines, restaurants, and foodservice distributors. [81]

The Coca-Cola Company owns minority shares in some of its largest franchises, such as Coca-Cola Enterprises, Coca-Cola Amatil, Coca-Cola Hellenic Bottling Company, and Coca-Cola FEMSA, as well as some smaller ones, such as Coca-Cola Bottlers Uzbekistan, but fully independent bottlers produce almost half of the volume sold in the world. Independent bottlers are allowed to sweeten the drink according to local tastes. [82]

The bottling plant in Skopje, Macedonia, received the 2009 award for "Best Bottling Company". [83]

Since it announced its intention to begin distribution in Myanmar in June 2012, Coca-Cola has been officially available in every country in the world except Cuba and North Korea. [84] However, it is reported to be available in both countries as a grey import. [85] [86]

Coca-Cola has been a point of legal discussion in the Middle East. In the early 20th century, a fatwa was created in Egypt to discuss the question of "whether Muslims were permitted to drink Coca-Cola and Pepsi cola." [87] The fatwa states: "According to the Muslim Hanefite, Shafi'ite, etc., the rule in Islamic law of forbidding or allowing foods and beverages is based on the presumption that such things are permitted unless it can be shown that they are forbidden on the basis of the Qur'an." [87] The Muslim jurists stated that, unless the Qu'ran specifically prohibits the consumption of a particular product, it is permissible to consume. Another clause was discussed, whereby the same rules apply if a person is unaware of the condition or ingredients of the item in question.

This is a list of variants of Coca-Cola introduced around the world. In addition to the caffeine-free version of the original, additional fruit flavors have been included over the years. Not included here are versions of Diet Coke and Coca-Cola Zero Sugar variant versions of those no-calorie colas can be found at their respective articles.

  • Caffeine-Free Coca-Cola (1983–present) – Coca-Cola without the caffeine.
  • Coca-Cola Cherry (1985–present) – Coca-Cola with a cherry flavor. Was available in Canada starting in 1996. Originally marketed as Cherry Coke (Cherry Coca-Cola) in North America until 2006.
  • New Coke / Coca-Cola II (1985–2002) – An unpopular formula change, remained after the original formula quickly returned and was later rebranded as Coca-Cola II until its full discontinuation in 2002. In 2019, New Coke was re-introduced to the market to promote the third season of the Netflix original series, Stranger Things.[88]
  • Golden Coca-Cola (2001) was a limited edition produced by Beijing Coca-Cola company to celebrate Beijing's successful bid to host the Olympics.
  • Coca-Cola with Lemon (2001–05) – Coca-Cola with a lemon flavor. Available in: Australia, American Samoa, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, China, Denmark, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland, Korea, Luxembourg, Macau, Malaysia, Mongolia, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Réunion, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Kingdom, United States and West Bank-Gaza
  • Coca-Cola Vanilla (2002–05 2007–present) – Coca-Cola with a vanilla flavor. Available in: Austria, Australia, China, Czech Republic, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Malaysia, Slovakia, South-Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States. It was reintroduced in June 2007 by popular demand.
  • Coca-Cola with Lime (2005–present) – Coca-Cola with a lime flavor. Available in Belgium, Lithuania, Netherlands, Singapore, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • Coca-Cola Raspberry (2005 2009–present) – Coca-Cola with a raspberry flavor. Originally only available in New Zealand. Available in: Australia, United States, and the United Kingdom in Coca-Cola Freestyle fountain since 2009.
  • Coca-Cola Black Cherry Vanilla (2006–07) – Coca-Cola with a combination of black cherry and vanilla flavor. It replaced and was replaced by Vanilla Coke in June 2007.
  • Coca-Cola Blāk (2006–08) – Coca-Cola with a rich coffee flavor, formula depends on the country. Only available in the United States, France, Canada, Czech Republic, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria and Lithuania
  • Coca-Cola Citra (2005–present) – Coca-Cola with a citrus flavor. Only available in Bosnia and Herzegovina [citation needed] , New Zealand, and Japan.
  • Coca-Cola Orange (2007) – Coca-Cola with an orange flavor. Was available in the United Kingdom and Gibraltar for a limited time. In Germany, Austria, and Switzerland it is sold under the label Mezzo Mix. Currently available in Coca-Cola Freestyle fountain outlets in the United States since 2009 and in the United Kingdom since 2014.
  • Coca-Cola Life (2013–2020) – A version of Coca-Cola with stevia and sugar as sweeteners rather than simply sugar.
  • Coca-Cola Ginger (2016–present) – A version that mixes in the taste of ginger beer. Available in Australia, New Zealand, and as a limited edition in Vietnam.
  • Coca-Cola Orange Vanilla (2019–present) – Coca-Cola with an orange vanilla flavor (intended to imitate the flavor of an orange Creamsicle). Made available nationwide in the United States on February 25, 2019. [89]
  • Coca-Cola Energy (2019–present) – An energy drink with a flavor similar to standard Coca-Cola, with guarana, vitamin B3 (niacinamide), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), and extra caffeine. Introduced in 2019 in the United Kingdom, [90] and released in the United States and Canada in January 2020. [91] Also available in zero-sugar, cherry, and zero-sugar + cherry variants. In May 2021, the company announced they would discontinue the product in North America but it will remain available in other places and it will focus on its traditional beverages. [92]
  • Coca-Cola Cinnamon (2019–present) – Coca-Cola with cinnamon flavor. Released in October 2019 in the United States as a limited release for the 2019 holiday season. [93] Made available again in 2020 for the holiday season.
  • Coca-Cola Cherry Vanilla (2020–present) – Coca-Cola with cherry vanilla flavor. Released in the United States on February 10, 2020.
  • Coca-Cola with Coffee (2019–present) – Coca-Cola, with coffee. Introduced in 2019 in various European markets, and released in the United States and Canada in January 2021. Available in dark blend, vanilla and caramel versions, and also in zero-sugar dark blend and vanilla variants.

Logo design

The Coca-Cola logo was created by John Pemberton's bookkeeper, Frank Mason Robinson, in 1885. [94] Robinson came up with the name and chose the logo's distinctive cursive script. The writing style used, known as Spencerian Script, was developed in the mid-19th century and was the dominant form of formal handwriting in the United States during that period. [95]

Robinson also played a significant role in early Coca-Cola advertising. His promotional suggestions to Pemberton included giving away thousands of free drink coupons and plastering the city of Atlanta with publicity banners and streetcar signs. [96]

Coca-Cola came under scrutiny in Egypt in 1951 because of a conspiracy theory that the Coca-Cola logo, when reflected in a mirror, spells out "No Mohammed no Mecca" in Arabic. [97]

Contour bottle design

The Coca-Cola bottle, called the "contour bottle" within the company, was created by bottle designer Earl R. Dean and Coca-Cola's general counsel, Harold Hirsch. In 1915, The Coca-Cola Company was represented by their general counsel to launch a competition among its bottle suppliers as well as any competition entrants to create a new bottle for their beverage that would distinguish it from other beverage bottles, "a bottle which a person could recognize even if they felt it in the dark, and so shaped that, even if broken, a person could tell at a glance what it was." [99] [100] [101] [102]

Chapman J. Root, president of the Root Glass Company of Terre Haute, Indiana, turned the project over to members of his supervisory staff, including company auditor T. Clyde Edwards, plant superintendent Alexander Samuelsson, and Earl R. Dean, bottle designer and supervisor of the bottle molding room. Root and his subordinates decided to base the bottle's design on one of the soda's two ingredients, the coca leaf or the kola nut, but were unaware of what either ingredient looked like. Dean and Edwards went to the Emeline Fairbanks Memorial Library and were unable to find any information about coca or kola. Instead, Dean was inspired by a picture of the gourd-shaped cocoa pod in the Encyclopædia Britannica. Dean made a rough sketch of the pod and returned to the plant to show Root. He explained to Root how he could transform the shape of the pod into a bottle. Root gave Dean his approval. [99]

Faced with the upcoming scheduled maintenance of the mold-making machinery, over the next 24 hours Dean sketched out a concept drawing which was approved by Root the next morning. Chapman Root approved the prototype bottle and a design patent was issued on the bottle in November 1915. The prototype never made it to production since its middle diameter was larger than its base, making it unstable on conveyor belts. Dean resolved this issue by decreasing the bottle's middle diameter. During the 1916 bottler's convention, Dean's contour bottle was chosen over other entries and was on the market the same year. By 1920, the contour bottle became the standard for The Coca-Cola Company. A revised version was also patented in 1923. Because the Patent Office releases the Patent Gazette on Tuesday, the bottle was patented on December 25, 1923, and was nicknamed the "Christmas bottle." Today, the contour Coca-Cola bottle is one of the most recognized packages on the planet. "even in the dark!". [35]

As a reward for his efforts, Dean was offered a choice between a $500 bonus or a lifetime job at the Root Glass Company. He chose the lifetime job and kept it until the Owens-Illinois Glass Company bought out the Root Glass Company in the mid-1930s. Dean went on to work in other Midwestern glass factories. [103]

Raymond Loewy updated the design in 1955 to accommodate larger formats. [104]

Others have attributed inspiration for the design not to the cocoa pod, but to a Victorian hooped dress. [105]

In 1944, Associate Justice Roger J. Traynor of the Supreme Court of California took advantage of a case involving a waitress injured by an exploding Coca-Cola bottle to articulate the doctrine of strict liability for defective products. Traynor's concurring opinion in Escola v. Coca-Cola Bottling Co. is widely recognized as a landmark case in U.S. law today. [106]

Types

Earl R. Dean's original 1915 concept drawing of the contour Coca-Cola bottle.

The prototype never made it to production since its middle diameter was larger than its base, making it unstable on conveyor belts.

Final production version with slimmer middle section.

Numerous historical bottles.

Designer bottles

Karl Lagerfeld is the latest designer to have created a collection of aluminum bottles for Coca-Cola. Lagerfeld is not the first fashion designer to create a special version of the famous Coca-Cola Contour bottle. A number of other limited edition bottles by fashion designers for Coca-Cola Light soda have been created in the last few years, including Jean Paul Gaultier. [98]

In 2009, in Italy, Coca-Cola Light had a Tribute to Fashion to celebrate 100 years of the recognizable contour bottle. Well known Italian designers Alberta Ferretti, Blumarine, Etro, Fendi, Marni, Missoni, Moschino, and Versace each designed limited edition bottles. [107]

In 2019, Coca-Cola shared the first beverage bottle made with ocean plastic. [108]

Pepsi, the flagship product of PepsiCo, The Coca-Cola Company's main rival in the soft drink industry, is usually second to Coke in sales, and outsells Coca-Cola in some markets. RC Cola, now owned by the Dr Pepper Snapple Group, the third-largest soft drink manufacturer, is also widely available. [109]

Around the world, many local brands compete with Coke. In South and Central America Kola Real, also known as Big Cola, is a growing competitor to Coca-Cola. [110] On the French island of Corsica, Corsica Cola, made by brewers of the local Pietra beer, is a growing competitor to Coca-Cola. In the French region of Brittany, Breizh Cola is available. In Peru, Inca Kola outsells Coca-Cola, which led The Coca-Cola Company to purchase the brand in 1999. In Sweden, Julmust outsells Coca-Cola during the Christmas season. [111] In Scotland, the locally produced Irn-Bru was more popular than Coca-Cola until 2005, when Coca-Cola and Diet Coke began to outpace its sales. [112] In the former East Germany, Vita Cola, invented during Communist rule, is gaining popularity.

In India, Coca-Cola ranked third behind the leader, Pepsi-Cola, and local drink Thums Up. The Coca-Cola Company purchased Thums Up in 1993. [113] As of 2004 [update] , Coca-Cola held a 60.9% market-share in India. [114] Tropicola, a domestic drink, is served in Cuba instead of Coca-Cola, due to a United States embargo. French brand Mecca Cola and British brand Qibla Cola are competitors to Coca-Cola in the Middle East. [ citation needed ]

In Turkey, Cola Turka, in Iran and the Middle East, Zamzam Cola and Parsi Cola, in some parts of China, China Cola, in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Kofola, in Slovenia, Cockta, and the inexpensive Mercator Cola, sold only in the country's biggest supermarket chain, Mercator, are some of the brand's competitors. Classiko Cola, made by Tiko Group, the largest manufacturing company in Madagascar, is a competitor to Coca-Cola in many regions. [ citation needed ]

Coca-Cola's advertising has significantly affected American culture, and it is frequently credited with inventing the modern image of Santa Claus as an old man in a red-and-white suit. Although the company did start using the red-and-white Santa image in the 1930s, with its winter advertising campaigns illustrated by Haddon Sundblom, the motif was already common. [115] [116] Coca-Cola was not even the first soft drink company to use the modern image of Santa Claus in its advertising: White Rock Beverages used Santa in advertisements for its ginger ale in 1923, after first using him to sell mineral water in 1915. [117] [118] Before Santa Claus, Coca-Cola relied on images of smartly dressed young women to sell its beverages. Coca-Cola's first such advertisement appeared in 1895, featuring the young Bostonian actress Hilda Clark as its spokeswoman.

1941 saw the first use of the nickname "Coke" as an official trademark for the product, with a series of advertisements informing consumers that "Coke means Coca-Cola". [119] In 1971, a song from a Coca-Cola commercial called "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing", produced by Billy Davis, became a hit single. During the 1950s the term "cola wars" emerged, describing the on-going battle between Coca-Cola and Pepsi for supremacy in the soft drink industry. Coca cola and Pepsi were competing with new products, global expansion, US marketing initiatives and sport sponsorships. [120]

Coke's advertising is pervasive, as one of Woodruff's stated goals was to ensure that everyone on Earth drank Coca-Cola as their preferred beverage. This is especially true in southern areas of the United States, such as Atlanta, where Coke was born.

Some Coca-Cola television commercials between 1960 through 1986 were written and produced by former Atlanta radio veteran Don Naylor (WGST 1936–1950, WAGA 1951–1959) during his career as a producer for the McCann Erickson advertising agency. Many of these early television commercials for Coca-Cola featured movie stars, sports heroes, and popular singers.

During the 1980s, Pepsi-Cola ran a series of television advertisements showing people participating in taste tests demonstrating that, according to the commercials, "fifty percent of the participants who said they preferred Coke actually chose the Pepsi." Statisticians pointed out the problematic nature of a 50/50 result: most likely, the taste tests showed that in blind tests, most people cannot tell the difference between Pepsi and Coke. Coca-Cola ran ads to combat Pepsi's ads in an incident sometimes referred to as the cola wars one of Coke's ads compared the so-called Pepsi challenge to two chimpanzees deciding which tennis ball was furrier. Thereafter, Coca-Cola regained its leadership in the market.

Selena was a spokesperson for Coca-Cola from 1989 until the time of her death. She filmed three commercials for the company. During 1994, to commemorate her five years with the company, Coca-Cola issued special Selena coke bottles. [121]

The Coca-Cola Company purchased Columbia Pictures in 1982, and began inserting Coke-product images into many of its films. After a few early successes during Coca-Cola's ownership, Columbia began to underperform, and the studio was sold to Sony in 1989.

Coca-Cola has gone through a number of different advertising slogans in its long history, including "The pause that refreshes", "I had like to buy the world a Coke", and "Coke is it".

In 1999, The Coca-Cola Company introduced the Coke Card, a loyalty program that offered deals on items like clothes, entertainment and food when the cardholder purchased a Coca-Cola Classic. The scheme was cancelled after three years, with a Coca-Cola spokesperson declining to state why. [122]

The company then introduced another loyalty campaign in 2006, My Coke Rewards. This allows consumers to earn points by entering codes from specially marked packages of Coca-Cola products into a website. These points can be redeemed for various prizes or sweepstakes entries. [123]

In Australia in 2011, Coca-Cola began the "share a Coke" campaign, where the Coca-Cola logo was replaced on the bottles and replaced with first names. Coca-Cola used the 150 most popular names in Australia to print on the bottles. [124] [125] [126] The campaign was paired with a website page, Facebook page, and an online "share a virtual Coke". The same campaign was introduced to Coca-Cola, Diet Coke & Coke Zero bottles and cans in the UK in 2013. [127] [128]

Coca-Cola has also advertised its product to be consumed as a breakfast beverage, instead of coffee or tea for the morning caffeine. [129] [130]

5 cents

From 1886 to 1959, the price of Coca-Cola was fixed at five cents, in part due to an advertising campaign.

Holiday campaigns

Throughout the years, Coca-Cola has released limited-time collector bottles for Christmas.

The "Holidays are coming!" advertisement features a train of red delivery trucks, emblazoned with the Coca-Cola name and decorated with Christmas lights, driving through a snowy landscape and causing everything that they pass to light up and people to watch as they pass through. [131]

The advertisement fell into disuse in 2001, as the Coca-Cola company restructured its advertising campaigns so that advertising around the world was produced locally in each country, rather than centrally in the company's headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. [132] In 2007, the company brought back the campaign after, according to the company, many consumers telephoned its information center saying that they considered it to mark the beginning of Christmas. [131] The advertisement was created by U.S. advertising agency Doner, and has been part of the company's global advertising campaign for many years. [133]

Keith Law, a producer and writer of commercials for Belfast CityBeat, was not convinced by Coca-Cola's reintroduction of the advertisement in 2007, saying that "I do not think there's anything Christmassy about HGVs and the commercial is too generic." [134]

In 2001, singer Melanie Thornton recorded the campaign's advertising jingle as a single, "Wonderful Dream (Holidays are Coming)", which entered the pop-music charts in Germany at no. 9. [135] [136] In 2005, Coca-Cola expanded the advertising campaign to radio, employing several variations of the jingle. [137]

In 2011, Coca-Cola launched a campaign for the Indian holiday Diwali. The campaign included commercials, a song, and an integration with Shah Rukh Khan's film Ra.One. [138] [139] [140]

Sports sponsorship

Coca-Cola was the first commercial sponsor of the Olympic Games, at the 1928 games in Amsterdam, and has been an Olympics sponsor ever since. [141] This corporate sponsorship included the 1996 Summer Olympics hosted in Atlanta, which allowed Coca-Cola to spotlight its hometown. Most recently, Coca-Cola has released localized commercials for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver one Canadian commercial referred to Canada's hockey heritage and was modified after Canada won the gold medal game on February 28, 2010 by changing the ending line of the commercial to say "Now they know whose game they're playing". [142]

Since 1978, Coca-Cola has sponsored the FIFA World Cup, and other competitions organized by FIFA. [143] One FIFA tournament trophy, the FIFA World Youth Championship from Tunisia in 1977 to Malaysia in 1997, was called "FIFA – Coca-Cola Cup". In addition, Coca-Cola sponsors NASCAR's annual Coca-Cola 600 and Coke Zero Sugar 400 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina and Daytona International Speedway in Daytona, Florida since 2020, Coca-Cola has served as a premier partner of the NASCAR Cup Series, which includes holding the naming rights to the series' regular season championship trophy. [144]

Coca-Cola has a long history of sports marketing relationships, which over the years have included Major League Baseball, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, and the National Hockey League, as well as with many teams within those leagues. Coca-Cola has had a longtime relationship with the NFL's Pittsburgh Steelers, due in part to the now-famous 1979 television commercial featuring "Mean Joe" Greene, leading to the two opening the Coca-Cola Great Hall at Heinz Field in 2001 and a more recent Coca-Cola Zero commercial featuring Troy Polamalu.

Coca-Cola is the official soft drink of many collegiate football teams throughout the nation, partly due to Coca-Cola providing those schools with upgraded athletic facilities in exchange for Coca-Cola's sponsorship. This is especially prevalent at the high school level, which is more dependent on such contracts due to tighter budgets.

Coca-Cola was one of the official sponsors of the 1996 Cricket World Cup held on the Indian subcontinent. Coca-Cola is also one of the associate sponsors of Delhi Daredevils in the Indian Premier League.

In England, Coca-Cola was the main sponsor of The Football League between 2004 and 2010, a name given to the three professional divisions below the Premier League in soccer (football). In 2005, Coca-Cola launched a competition for the 72 clubs of The Football League – it was called "Win a Player". This allowed fans to place one vote per day for their favorite club, with one entry being chosen at random earning £250,000 for the club this was repeated in 2006. The "Win A Player" competition was very controversial, as at the end of the 2 competitions, Leeds United A.F.C. had the most votes by more than double, yet they did not win any money to spend on a new player for the club. In 2007, the competition changed to "Buy a Player". This competition allowed fans to buy a bottle of Coca-Cola or Coca-Cola Zero and submit the code on the wrapper on the Coca-Cola website. This code could then earn anything from 50p to £100,000 for a club of their choice. This competition was favored over the old "Win a Player" competition, as it allowed all clubs to win some money. Between 1992 and 1998, Coca-Cola was the title sponsor of the Football League Cup (Coca-Cola Cup), the secondary cup tournament of England. Starting in 2019-20 season, Drinks giant Coca-Cola has agreed its biggest UK sponsorship deal by becoming Premier League football's seventh and final commercial partner [145] for the UK and Ireland, China, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Egyptian and the West African markets.

Between 1994 and 1997, Coca-Cola was also the title sponsor of the Scottish League Cup, renaming it to the Coca-Cola Cup like its English counterpart. From 1998 to 2001, the company was the title sponsor of the Irish League Cup in Northern Ireland, where it was named the Coca-Cola League Cup.

Coca-Cola is the presenting sponsor of the Tour Championship, the final event of the PGA Tour held each year at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta, GA. [146]

Introduced March 1, 2010, in Canada, to celebrate the 2010 Winter Olympics, Coca-Cola sold gold colored cans in packs of 12 355 mL (12 imp fl oz 12 US fl oz) each, in select stores. [147]

In mass media

Coca-Cola has been prominently featured in many films and television programs. It was a major plot element in films such as One, Two, Three, The Coca-Cola Kid, and The Gods Must Be Crazy, among many others. In music, in the Beatles' song, "Come Together", the lyrics say, "He shoot Coca-Cola", he say. The Beach Boys also referenced Coca-Cola in their 1964 song "All Summer Long" (i.e. Member when you spilled Coke all over your blouse?) [148]

The best selling solo artist of all time [149] Elvis Presley, promoted Coca-Cola during his last tour of 1977. [150] The Coca-Cola Company used Elvis' image to promote the product. [151] For example, the company used a song performed by Presley, A Little Less Conversation, in a Japanese Coca-Cola commercial. [152]

Other artists that promoted Coca-Cola include David Bowie, [153] George Michael, [154] Elton John, [155] and Whitney Houston, [156] who appeared in the Diet Coke commercial, among many others.

Not all musical references to Coca-Cola went well. A line in "Lola" by the Kinks was originally recorded as "You drink champagne and it tastes just like Coca-Cola." When the British Broadcasting Corporation refused to play the song because of the commercial reference, lead singer Ray Davies re-recorded the lyric as "it tastes just like cherry cola" to get airplay for the song. [157] [158]

Political cartoonist Michel Kichka satirized a famous Coca-Cola billboard in his 1982 poster "And I Love New York." On the billboard, the Coca-Cola wave is accompanied by the words "Enjoy Coke." In Kichka's poster, the lettering and script above the Coca-Cola wave instead read "Enjoy Cocaine." [159]

Coca-Cola has a high degree of identification with the United States, being considered by some an "American Brand" or as an item representing America, criticized as Cocacolonization. After World War II, this gave rise to the brief production of White Coke by the request of and for Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who did not want to be seen drinking a symbol of American imperialism. The bottles were given by the President Eisenhower during a conference, and Marshal Zhukov enjoyed the drink. The bottles were disguised as vodka bottles, with the cap having a red star design, to avoid suspicion of Soviet officials. [160] The drink is also often a metonym for the Coca-Cola Company.

Coca-Cola was introduced to China in 1927, and was very popular until 1949. After the Chinese Civil War ended in 1949, the beverage was no longer imported into China, as it was perceived to be a symbol of decadent Western culture and the capitalist lifestyle. Importation and sales of the beverage resumed in 1979, after diplomatic relations between the United States and China were restored. [161]

There are some consumer boycotts of Coca-Cola in Arab countries due to Coke's early investment in Israel during the Arab League boycott of Israel (its competitor Pepsi stayed out of Israel). [162] Mecca-Cola and Pepsi are popular alternatives in the Middle East. [163]

A Coca-Cola fountain dispenser (officially a Fluids Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus or FGBA) was developed for use on the Space Shuttle as a test bed to determine if carbonated beverages can be produced from separately stored carbon dioxide, water, and flavored syrups and determine if the resulting fluids can be made available for consumption without bubble nucleation and resulting foam formation. FGBA-1 flew on STS-63 in 1995 and dispensed pre-mixed beverages, followed by FGBA-2 on STS-77 the next year. The latter mixed CO₂, water, and syrup to make beverages. It supplied 1.65 liters each of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke. [164] [165]

Coca-Cola is sometimes used for the treatment of gastric phytobezoars. In about 50% of cases studied, Coca-Cola alone was found to be effective in gastric phytobezoar dissolution. Unfortunately, this treatment can result in the potential of developing small bowel obstruction in a minority of cases, necessitating surgical intervention. [166] [167]

Criticism of Coca-Cola has arisen from various groups around the world, concerning a variety of issues, including health effects, environmental issues, and business practices. The drink's coca flavoring, and the nickname "Coke", remain a common theme of criticism due to the relationship with the illegal drug cocaine. In 1911, the US government seized 40 barrels and 20 kegs of Coca-Cola syrup in Chattanooga, Tennessee, alleging the caffeine in its drink was "injurious to health", leading to amended food safety legislation. [168]

Beginning in the 1940s, Pepsi started marketing their drinks to African Americans, a niche market that was largely ignored by white-owned manufacturers in the US, and was able to use its anti-racism stance as a selling point, attacking Coke's reluctance to hire blacks and support by the chairman of The Coca-Cola Company for segregationist Governor of Georgia Herman Talmadge. [169] As a result of this campaign, Pepsi's market share as compared to Coca-Cola's shot up dramatically in the 1950s with African American soft-drink consumers three times more likely to purchase Pepsi over Coke. [170]

The Coca-Cola Company, its subsidiaries and products have been subject to sustained criticism by consumer groups, environmentalists, and watchdogs, particularly since the early 2000s. [171] In 2019, BreakFreeFromPlastic named Coca-Cola the single biggest plastic polluter in the world. After 72,541 volunteers collected 476,423 pieces of plastic waste from around where they lived, a total of 11,732 pieces were found to be labeled with a Coca-Cola brand (including the Dasani, Sprite, and Fanta brands) in 37 countries across four continents. [172] At the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos, Coca-Cola's Head of Sustainability, Bea Perez, said customers like them because they reseal and are lightweight, and "business won't be in business if we don't accommodate consumers." [173]

Coca-Cola Classic is rich in sugars, especially sucrose, which causes dental caries when consumed regularly. Besides this, the high caloric value of the sugars themselves can contribute to obesity. Both are major health issues in the developed world. [174]

In February 2021, Coca-Cola received criticism after a video of a training session, which told employees to "try to be less white", was leaked by an employee. The session also said in order to be "less white" employees had to be less "arrogant" and "defensive". [175] [176]

In July 2001, the Coca-Cola company was sued over its alleged use of political far-right wing death squads (the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia) to kidnap, torture, and kill Colombian bottler workers that were linked with trade union activity. Coca-Cola was sued in a US federal court in Miami by the Colombian food and drink union Sinaltrainal. The suit alleged that Coca-Cola was indirectly responsible for having "contracted with or otherwise directed paramilitary security forces that utilized extreme violence and murdered, tortured, unlawfully detained or otherwise silenced trade union leaders". This sparked campaigns to boycott Coca-Cola in the UK, US, Germany, Italy, and Australia. [177] [178] Javier Correa, the president of Sinaltrainal, said the campaign aimed to put pressure on Coca-Cola "to mitigate the pain and suffering" that union members had suffered. [178]

Speaking from the Coca-Cola company's headquarters in Atlanta, company spokesperson Rafael Fernandez Quiros said "Coca-Cola denies any connection to any human-rights violation of this type" and added "We do not own or operate the plants". [179]


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